Category Archives: Elections

Can’t Wait For The 1st, 2016 Democratic Primary Debate (Just Kidding)

Democrats, Elections, Political Philosophy, Socialism

If he’s smart, and he is, Jim Webb, former senator from Virginia, and Democratic candidate for 2016, will ignore his revolting rivals during the first, upcoming, 2016 Democratic Primary Debate, and make eyes (by which I mean aim to please) at Donald Trump and his broad base. The last includes Southern Democrats, believe me.

By the way, when is this much-anticipated snore-cum-puke fest? (Found the date: October 13, 2015.)

How many viewers do you think the first, Democratic Primary Debate will draw? I’ll throw out a guess: 4 million? (As opposed to …)

Who are the other participants, aside Webb, Bernie-For-Socialism-But-Some-2nd-Amendment-Rights Sanders, and Hillary Rodham Clinton? Do you know? Jim Webb will probably be the only candidate worth watching.

In “Trump Should Triangulate,” Webb was recommended to Trump as a candidate for the Trump ticket:

James Webb, the decorated Marine who served as Ronald Reagan’s secretary of the navy, is no GOP loyalist, either. Webb, indisputably the last salt-of-the-earth Democrat, is considering a bid for president as a … Democrat.

Trump would do well to triangulate, à la Bill Clinton, and place the talented Mr. Webb on the Trump ticket. Then, make immigration a central theme in the campaign, advance a principled, major, pro-black policy by speaking to the legalization or decriminalizing of drug use and sale—and Trump will have secured the vote of blacks, white southern Democrats and other Reagan Democrats. Like no other, drug legalization is a proxy black issue, worthy of the endorsement of the “Black Lives Matter” movement.

A ticket sporting two Alpha Males, moreover, is likely to infuriate the Alpha females of media (including those with the Y chromosome).

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Welcome To The Jungle Of Post-Constitutional America

Constitution, Democrats, Elections, Objectivism, Politics, Republicans

Nowhere has this libertarian declared in support of Donald Trump. I chronicle and analyze our politics, but, until now, I’ve refrained from partaking in it. This could change, but that’s how it is right now. Nevertheless, at least one reader has confused an analysis of The Positive Process of Trump with an endorsement of the candidate.

A careful reading of The Trump File will show that matters of process are being emphasized:

1. Differences between political incentives in operation and apolitical incentives (Trump’s) in operation. Trump cannot be compared, on the meta-level, to a politician.
2. The Constitution is a dead letter. In this post-constitutional jungle, the law of the jungle is what prevails. Do we get a benevolent authoritarian to veto Obama’s legacies, or do we continue to submit to Demopublican diktats? That’s the best we can hope for until the center falls apart and gives way to the process of secession.

Speaking of dissolving the chains that bind us to the center: Viva Catalonian secession from Spain. Good for Catalonians. They have begun the process.


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Donald, Don’t Let Fox News Roger America … Again

Elections, Neoconservatism, Propaganda, Republicans, War

“Donald, Don’t Let Fox News Roger America … Again” is the current column, now on The Unz Review, America’s smartest webzine. The column concludes that:

… Trump is good for liberty:

By waging internecine warfare against the political masters and their mouthpiece (FNC), Trump is undermining the bastions of neoconservatism in America; he is dealing a structural blow to the edifice of Beltway Republicanism.

In response, the Beltway boys are rising on their little hind legs.

As Megyn Kelly riffed about Trump’s sexism, Fox News commentator Rich Lowry blurted out this on Kelly’s File: “Carly Fiorina cut Trump’s balls off with the precision of a surgeon.” (Kelly, who is turning out to be rather vacuous, detected no sexism there.)

Another slick Republican strategist, Rick Wilson, a regular on CNN, recently asked Trump supporter Ann Coulter on Twitter if Trump paid her ‘more for anal.’

Trump, for his part, fired first on the political flank. Now, in a pincer movement, Trump opened up a new front and is gunning for the establishment’s media megaphone.

This is why Trump’s war with Fox News is part of a just, liberating war. …

… Read the complete column. “Donald, Don’t Let Fox News Roger America … Again” is the current column, now on The Unz Review.

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Marco Rubio’s Insane Ideation

Elections, Foreign Policy, Neoconservatism, Republicans, Russia

If America busies itself not with war, but with commerce, the shift in prestige will be away from politicians and back to The People and the private economy. At bottom, what neoconservative Macro Rubio is petrified about—reflexively, not consciously—is no longer being a politician in the country that is the number one bully of the world. What will the likes of Rubio and others like him do? Their ambitions will be stymied.

Marco Rubio’s rabid neoconservative ideation surfaced during the second primary season Republican debate, at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California:


Well, first of all, I have an understanding of exactly what it is Russia and Putin are doing, and it’s pretty straightforward. He wants to reposition Russia, once again, as a geopolitical force.

He himself said that the destruction of the Soviet Union — the fall of the Soviet Union was the greatest geopolitical catastrophe of the 20th century, and now he’s trying to reverse that.

He’s trying to destroy NATO [boohoo]. And this is what this is a part of. He is exploiting a vacuum that this administration has left in the Middle East.

Here’s what you’re gonna see in the next few weeks: the Russians will begin to fly — fly combat missions in that region, not just targeting ISIS, but in order to prop up Assad.

He will also, then, turn to other countries in the region and say, “America is no longer a reliable ally, Egypt. America is no longer a reliable ally, Saudi Arabia. Begin to rely on us.”

What he is doing is he is trying to replace us as the single most important power broker in the Middle East, and this president is allowing it. That is what is happening in the Middle East. That’s what’s happening with Russia, and…

Incidentally, CNN must have done a fair job at the debate, because Sean Hannity was going blotto on the radio, dismissing the event as no more than the political equivalent of Vince McMahon’s World Wrestling Entertainment. Juxtapose CNN’s relaxed timing with dominatrix Megyn Kelly’s whipping the men into shape—and the dialogue encouraged between candidates last night looks like another positive feature of the event. I agree with Donald Trump that the event was too long.

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At Simi Valley, Jingoism, Military Offensives, Military Build Up & An Arms Race Trump

Elections, Foreign Policy, Iran, libertarianism, Middle East, Military, Neoconservatism, Republicans

The second primary season Republican debate took place at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California. It didn’t disappoint. It was, as one commentator ventured, the Super Bowl of politics.

The matinee sported the least popular candidates, cobbling together a meager one percent in the polls (two are at … zero). The debate, however, was probably the more substantive of the two sessions. (Alas, as beautifully as CNN had staged the Presidential Library, the rendition of the national anthem was G-d awful. Apparently, they could not find a decent singer in Simi Valley, although, according to Yelp, there are plenty performing arts and opera studios in the vicinity.)

CNN certainly put Fox News to shame. Unlike the first primetime Republican debate, in Cleveland, Ohio, where anchor Megyn Kelly took center stage and singled out Donald Trump for a splenetic attack; CNN’s Jake Tapper (moderator), chief political correspondent Dana Bash, and Hugh Hewitt of the Salem Radio Network, concentrated the debate on the issues and the individuals behind the lecterns. (As always, nothing their in-house studio pundits predicted or advised prior to the debate transpired.)

Ms. Bash briefly did a Kelly, when she attempted to tap Jeb Bush’s anger over a quip Donald Trump had once made about Jeb’s Mexican wife influencing his perspective on immigration. Trump refused to grovel. This was good. However, he did show contrition over unkind cuts he had made about Carly Fiorina’s face. Fiorina could have cracked a smile (or maybe she couldn’t, given the possible nip-and-cuts to The Face).

Fiorina—whom media types like moron S. E. Cupp keep calling “Carly,” for some reason—is indubitably a clear and logical thinker, with a facility with the English language. What a shame that her words are those of a consummate neoconservative who wants to commit the country to a buildup of a military that is already the largest in the world, America’s, and an arms race with China and Russia.

The matinee featured two senators and two governors: the sitting senator from South Carolina, Lindsey Graham, and the former senator from Pennsylvania, Rick Santorum, as well as the sitting governor of Louisiana, Bobby Jindal, and former New York Governor George Pataki.

Pataki, it was noted, had refused to take the Trump Pledge, saying that even if Trump were the Republican nominee, he, Pataki, would not support him.

Jindal’s introduction bears repeating:

“I don’t have a famous last name. My daddy didn’t run for president. I don’t have a reality TV show. I’ll tell you what I do have, I’ve got the backbone, I’ve got the bandwidth, I’ve got the experience to get us through these tough times, to make sure that we don’t turn the American dream into the European nightmare.”

When challenged about his violation of Ronald Reagan’s 11th Commandment—against attacking fellow Republicans—Bobby Jindal responded speedily to say Donald Trump, whom he has been savaging, was neither a Republican or a conservative and would eventually implode. About the man currently in office Jindal’s remark had me laughing:

“Obama has declared war on trans fats and a truce with Iran. Think about that. He’s more worried about Twinkies than he is about the ayatollahs having a nuclear weapon.”

Jindal on immigration: Without assimilation immigration is invasion.

Lindsey Graham’s case of War Tourette’s is only getting worse.

Ask him about immigration and the answer is: We’ll fix it by going to war against ISIS.

Ask him about the economy and the answer is: 10,000 American boots on Iraq’s blood-soaked soil.

Ask him about the year of the political outsiders and his chances as an insider and the answer is: Let’s get on with winning a war, any war. Give me waaaaaaaar.

Follow up with, “Why do Republican voters view your service in government as a liability and not an asset?” and Graham replies: “Obama is making a mess of the world … I am so ready to get on with winning a war …”

With Lindsey, all roads lead to war.

It didn’t help that Graham derisively paired libertarians with vegetarians when appealing to the different constituencies that would warm to his war-all-the-time Tourette’s.

Graham is the consummate globalist. He did, however, surprise by declaring that birthright citizenship was “bastardizes citizenship.” Unlike equal-opportunity fencer Scott Walker who perceives a problem on the Canadian border, Graham, who decried birthright tourism, conceded to never meeting an illegal Canadian. Too true.

American and European governments have settled comfortably into a pattern of using the funds they extract from their overburdened taxpayers to promiscuously promote the welfare of citizens the world over. This flouts the mandate of every government! In this context, Santorum made a very important point relevant to all the communities currently being flooded by the decree of D.C., Brussels and Berlin:

“This debate should not be about what we’re going to do with someone who’s here illegally; this debate should be about what-what every other debate on every other policy issue is in America. What’s in the best interest of hardworking Americans? What’s in the best interest of our country.”

That’ll be the day.

As was the case with the Republican candidates in the previous election cycle (Mitt Romney included), no foreign policy learning curve is evident among this crop.

Indeed, by the time the two grueling sessions ended, well into the night, all 15 Republican candidates—bar Rand Paul and, to a degree, Donald Trump—had asserted that American exceptionalism lay in leading the world not in technological innovation, comity, commerce and as exemplars of individual rights—but by projecting America’s military power the world over. Somehow, the candidates viewed the US government’s bankruptcy as having no bearing on their unanimous plans for an arms race with Russia and China and renewed military offensives in the Middle East.

Rand Paul came as close as possible to the libertarian ideal on all wars, the drug war too: refrain from a rash foreign policy, engage with Russia and China, talk to the Mullahs before you “bomb, bomb, bomb, Iran” (a jingle popularized by jingoist John McCain), leave drug policy to the states (not ideal, for consumption is to be left to the individual, but better than most). To not have signed on to the bombing of Assad was a good thing. Have we learned nothing about the perils of toppling dictators, only to see the rise of barbarians worse than their predecessors?

That was Rand Paul. He did alright.

Sadly, Trump fell for the Hugh Hewitt gambit: Instead of standing with Ron Paul’s foreign policy (and capturing the Left), Trump went on to condemn the Republicans on the podium for their (short-lived) wisdom of voting against the bombing of Syria.

Rand Paul and Donald Trump excepted, all subscribe to the hackneyed lies about the root-causes of Middle-East instability and why the region’s populations are on the move (naturally, the magnet of western welfare went unmentioned): They assert Bashar Hafez al-Assad needs to be removed, when in fact he was the source of stability in Syria, much as Saddam Hussein was in Iraq.

If Assad is the reason Syrian, Iraqi and Libyan populations are emigrating en masse (NOT)—then America’s lack of a more energetic involvement in Iraq and Syria the candidates consider the solution to the problem.

Neoconservatives are still in the business of creating their own parallel reality and forcing us to inhabit the ruins.

Unless in defense of the realm, Americans are not keen on more of the same foreign-policy folly. Let us keep our military mitts to ourselves. Let us defend our own borders. That, it would seem, is the prevailing sentiment among Republicans, although not among the establishmentarians who occupied the Reagan Library for the debate.

Oh, and did I mention that, while he’s demeanor was very good, Donald Trump made absolutely no attempt to show some familiarity with the issues? Trump might want to rethink this approach, for it belies the candidate’s claim to have surrounded himself with the best people possible, or to have good judgement.

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ET TU, Glenn Beck?

Conservatism, Elections, Glenn Beck, Media, Race, Republicans

Glenn Beck is insufferably sanctimonious and impossible to listen to as a broadcaster. Since the Glenn guy is not working with much, to put it charitably, he has been unable to discern the reasons for the support Donald Trump has garnered among GOPers. This backing lies in Trump’s following being able to viscerally, if not intellectually, sense the following:

To understand why his campaign has legs, it is necessary to grasp the difference between The Donald and The Career Politician. Why so? Because although his supporters can ill-articulate these differences, they live them and feel them viscerally. Their reaction to Mr. Trump is informed by a sense of Trump the private citizen, the businessman, the anti-politician. As such, they grasp that Trump’s reality, incentives and motives sharply diverge from those of the professional politician. His reasons for doing what he’s doing are different.

Differently put: A successful politician and a successful businessman represent two solitudes, never the twain shall meet—except when the capitalist must curry favor with the politician so as to further his business interests, a reality brought about by corrupt politics. Trump’s donations to both parties fit a pattern forced by the regulatory state, whereby, in order to keep doing business, business is compelled to buy-off politicians.

MORE IN MY “Trump Should Triangulate.”

“Radio host Glenn Beck doubled down in his game of race-card Blackjack against Trump supporters,” reports WND:

“Beck took to Facebook Tuesday night and reiterated his stance against the GOP front-runner’s base: it is composed of fake tea party members who dislike President Obama because he is black. …”

WND cites Trump supporters in their own defense:

“I have been a Tea Party member for years and I support Trump. I despise the ‘Republicans’ who lie to us just to get elected then work with Obama. You say that you just don’t understand why people support Trump. You say ‘he is just a TV star’. Ronald Reagan was ‘just a TV star’ and he was the best President ever,” wrote Rick Henry. “I have watched you since you first started babbling about being a conservative … and you still just continue to babble foolish things.”

“Americans are tired of being told they suck and they are stupid. They are tired of being put behind non-Americans in our own country. Donald is saying he will fix that. You are assuming the American people are stupid. If you want Ted Cruz as the nominee you need to get Ted Cruz to open his mouth and speak the truth to the American people,” added Deb Medley-Kammerer.

Slick Republican strategist Rick Wilson, by the way, is a regular on CNN and is more disgusting than cretin S.E. Cupp, if not nearly as dumb as her. “Wilson recently accused Breitbart’s editor-in-chief Alex Marlow of covering the billionaire real estate mogul for website traffic. He also asked Ann Coulter on Twitter if Trump pays her ‘more for anal.’ The tweet was quickly deleted.”


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