Category Archives: Elections

UPDATED (10/2): NEW COLUMN: Trump Floated Like A Butterfly And Stung Like A Bee

Conflict, Democracy, Democrats, Donald Trump, Elections

NEW COLUMN, “Trump Floated Like A Butterfly And Stung Like A Bee,” appeared on the  Unz Review, WND.COM, the Quarterly Review out of London, founded in 1809. It is now a feature on American Greatness.

An excerpt:

The first presidential debate, on Tuesday 29, was also the first bit of fun we’ve had in a while.

True, President Donald J. Trump failed to float his theory about that “big fat shot in the ass” Joe Biden likely got from his handlers, to allow the Democratic candidate to nimbly prance onto the debate stage and, “for two hours,” be “better than ever before.”

But, like Muhammad Ali, the heavyweight boxing legend, POTUS floated like a butterfly and stung like a bee. A masculine force at full tilt, Mr. Trump provided plenty energy and entertainment as he blattered Joe Biden, while being funny in the process.

“If you didn’t enjoy that debate, you are a soy-boy, beta cuck,” a fun-loving fella tweeted out. Soy-boy Shapiro was having none of the fun stuff. Glum and sanctimonious, Ben tweeted out: “I literally have no idea who won this debate. I just know we all lost.”

Deep, man.

The self-styled philosopher-king’s funereal pronouncement received the benefit of a Michelle Malkin reenactment. Don’t miss that hilarity, 3:40 minutes into her post-debate podcast.

In letting out a collective primal groan that was music to MAGA ears, Ben-Shap was joined by every liberal and Never Trumpster on the left-wing game reserve.

Dana Bash of CNN lamented a “shitshow,” in which “the American people lost.” “The debate was a disaster for democracy,” her shell-shocked colleagues yelped. (Well, good, because the founders of this republic didn’t think much of democracy.)

Certainly, judging by the rabid frothing and foaming on CNN, Trump did indeed win Tuesday’s debate. Anderson Cooper whinged to Republican commentator Rick Santorum: “It’s not even funny. Are you proud of the president? Santorum could not conceal a grin: “He came out HOT.”

Livid, Van Jones deployed his best rhetorical device: repetition. “Three things happened: The president refused to condemn white supremacy. The president refused to condemn white supremacy. The president refused to condemn white supremacy.” Gloria Borger, also at CNN, required sedation.

A man infatuated with his own cleverness, Jake Tapper bewailed “the worst debate in history, a hot mess, inside a dumpster fire, inside a train wreck.” (Who wrote that “hot mess”?) Tapper forgot an interesting tidbit: Such fires are typically lit by the “idea” called Antifa.

Yes, Biden had called Antifa an idea. …

… READ THE REST… NEW COLUMN,  “Trump Floated Like A Butterfly And Stung Like A Bee,” appeared on the  Unz Review, WND.COM, the Quarterly Review out of London, founded in 1809. It is now a feature on American Greatness.

UPDATE (10/2): In reply to the  Comment:

“The hive media”: I will have to steal that. Have you, sir, heard Ben-Shap speak? It’s hard to believe anyone would listen to a rapid-fire chipmunk. Content: mediocre, Republican fare.

Dennis Kucinich was a very nice presence in politics. The late Robert Byrd was a great constitutionalist, too, a Democrat who could not escape the idiot comments from Republicans about his past. Byrd opposed Obama Care and other extra-constitutional adventurism.

Trump Won: He Floated Like A Butterfly And Stung Like A Bee

Democracy, Democrats, Donald Trump, Elections, Media, Populism, Race, Racism

The first presidential debate, Tuesday, was also the first bit of fun we’ve had in a while. A real hoot. While President Trump failed to float his theory about that “big injection” Biden’s handlers administer in the Democrat’s behind to prop and pep him up, as POTUS did during a recent rally—Mr. Trump provided plenty energy and entertainment.

“If you didn’t enjoy that debate, you are a soy-boy, beta cuck,” a fun fella tweeted out .

Don’t get all sanctimonious. When I wrote The Trump Revolution: The Donald’s Creative Destruction Deconstructed, I stipulated that “we inhabit what broadcaster Mark Levin has termed a post-constitutional America, a post-constitutional jungle, where the law of the jungle prevails.

In the age of unconstitutional government, contended The Trump Revolution, the best liberty lovers can look to is “action and counteraction, force and counterforce in the service of liberty.” Until such time when the individual is king again, and a decentralized constitution that guarantees regional and individual autonomy has been restored—the process of creative destruction begun by Mr. Trump is likely the best Americans can hope for.

Things have worsened since then. Civilized debate was not to be had, the Trump agenda having long since been discredited by the smart set. What remains is to win by brute force. The best one can hope for in country riven by irreconcilable conflict and driven to distraction by Trump Derangement Syndrome is to win a debate and score a few laughs. Those the president delivered in spades.  He blattered Joe Biden and was funny in the process.

As predicted, the first presidential debate, Tuesday, September 29, was also the first bit of fun we’ve had for a long time. POTUS circulated Biden like Cassius Clay, aka Muhammad Ali: he floated like a butterfly and certainly stung like a bee. However, in Biden’s defense one must concede that the poor thing was not on the ropes. He held on for all he was worth.

Judging by the rabid frothing and foaming on CNN, Trump did indeed win the Tuesday debate. Anderson Cooper whinged to Republican Rick Santorum: “It’s not even funny. Are you proud of the president?? Santorum could not conceal a smirk: “He came out HOT.”

Van Jones: “Three things happened: The president refused to condemn White Supremacy. The president refused to condemn White Supremacy. The president refused to condemn White Supremacy. Gloria Borger, also of CNN, required sedation.?

What did I tell you? All the indicators of a successful evening for the president.

To top is all, Trump refused to call Gavin McInnes and his Proud Boys white supremacists. How stunningly good was that? Roared POTUS: “Proud Boys standback and standby. This is not a right-wing problem; it’s the Left. Somebody has to do something about Antifa.”

The Proud Boys are anti-Antifa street brawlers (although whites fighting back is racist by default).

“The Kids” came up again, a barometer of all things silly. Only a silly society goes by the tantrums of The Kids, who’re just aping their parents. But to our joy, they, the little perspicacious brats, brought CNN’s Dana Bash to tears. Yes, Donald Trump is bad for the nation’s well-indoctrinated kids, who perform on cue.
Winning.

UPDATED (7/12/020): Have Republicans Dismissed Older Voters As Non-Essential Livers?

America, Conservatism, COVID-19, Culture, Donald Trump, Elections, Republicans

A mild-mannered, conservative man and his wife were interviewed by CNN at the National Mall on July 4.

It looked like they could be closeted Trump voters. The telltale signs: Much to the irritation of the CNN reporter, the couple refused to say anything bad about the president and kept the discussion classy and neutral. In other words, white, typically nice; a middle-class, older American couple: the Trump cohort.

To the question, “Do you like the idea of big crowds here?”, the man apologetically replied: “I’m old and diabetic. I don’t want to die. Protect me with your actions.” He was not over 55, so not in the least “old.” Yet he had certainly been conditioned to think of himself as redundant.

In the youth-horsewhipping, silly society that is America, the man had reason to be afraid: Older people have been cast as nonessential livers. Remember the asinine Republican pol who proclaimed, “There are more important things than living”? Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick (R) was directing his life-cherishing message to the older Trump voter. “Come on. Be a sport. Give it up for the greater good.”

Indeed, conservatives keep being dismissive about COVID. And when the older, at-risk age-group is mentioned, Republicans routinely imply they should self-isolate—and should certainly not expect anyone to wear a mask for them.

Hunker in-place if you’re over the hill.

Is anyone aware of the average age group of those doing cutting-edge COVID research?

Prognosticating about America’s 2020 election, The Economist notes the reason that “Donald Trump’s facing a much bigger task than he did in 2016″:

Mr Trump is being dragged down by the dramatic movement of older voters, horrified by the now-exploding spread of covid-19, away from him. Overall, Mr Biden’s vote margin has increased by about five points over Mrs Clinton’s final performance in 2016 among people who voted last time round, according to an analysis of YouGov’s data. Voters over 65 have led the charge; their vote margin for Mr Biden is six points better than Mrs Clinton’s was, whereas that of voters under 30 has not budged at all. White voters have also fled Mr Trump’s ranks in much larger numbers than voters of colour. Mr Biden is seven points ahead of Mrs Clinton’s position among whites, while Hispanics have moved six points towards Mr Trump (though they still overwhelmingly oppose him).

UPDATED (7/12/020): LinkedIn for some, but not others?
“LinkedIn is replete with political commentary and political commentators. Yet, here is an individual attempting to banish a perfectly proper inquiry (all inquiries are proper), echoed in an august news magazine. Other than his offense of censorship and cancel culture—why does said individual just not hang-out around motivational speakers like himself? Why silence others?

How Dramatically Did Women’s Suffrage Change the Size and Scope of Government?

Democracy, Elections, Feminism, Gender, Political Economy, The State

In 2007, I ventured that, “I’d give up my vote if that would guarantee that all women were denied the vote.”—ILANA Mercer (August 8, 2007)

Coming from the anti-statist stance, the sentiment is a solid one. It’s anchored in data.

One only has to trace the statistically significant correlation between women’s suffrage and the change in the size and scope of the state, as did John R. Lott, Jr. (Yale University) and Lawrence W. Kenny (University of Florida), to realize that the female suffrage has undermined the small-government project.

How Dramatically Did Women’s Suffrage Change the Size and Scope of Government?” is in the Journal of Political Economy (Vol. 107, Number 6, Part 1, pp. 1163-1198, December 1999).

Of course, the tipping point has long been reached, so my altruistic gesture would be in vain.

Naturally, some will laud the growth of government under female tutelage; others will lament it.

Abstract

This paper examines the growth of government during this century as a result of giving women the right to vote. Using cross-sectional time-series data for 1870 to 1940, we examine state government expenditures and revenue as well as voting by U.S. House and Senate state delegations and the passage of a wide range of different state laws. Suffrage coincided with immediate increases in state government expenditures and revenue and more liberal voting patterns for federal representatives, and these effects continued growing over time as more women took advantage of the franchise. Contrary to many recent suggestions, the gender gap is not something that has arisen since the 1970s, and it helps explain why American government started growing when it did.

And look at these excerpts with their bold deductions. The following writers would have been “canceled” by the bumper crops of cretins who control the American intelligentsia (that is not very intelligent).

It  is  not  really  surprising  that  this   welfare  state  should   breed   a politics  not  of  “justice”  or  “fairness”  but  of  “compassion,”  which contemporary  liberalism  has  elevated  into   the  most   important  civic virtue.  Women  tend  to  be  more  sentimental,   more  risk-averse   and less  competitive  than  men—yes,   it’s   Mars   vs.   Venus—and   therefore are  less  inclined   to   be  appreciative   of  free-market  economics,   in which   there   are   losers   as   well   as   winners.   College-educated women—the  kind  who  attend  Democratic  conventions—are   also more   “permissive”    and   less    “judgmental”    on    such    issues    as homosexuality,  capital  punishment,  even  pornography.

—Irving  Kristol,  “The  Feminization  of  the  Democrats,” The Wall Street Journal (September 9, 1996): p. A16

Citing   marriage   as   “a   very   important   financial   divider,”   the American   Enterprise   Institute’s   Doug   Besharov    suggests    more married women did not  vote  for  Dole because of a widespread sense of societal insecurity: “It is not that  they  distrust  their  husband,  but they  have  seen  divorce  all  around  them  and  know  they  could  be next.”  The  Polling  Company’s  Kellyanne  Fitzpatrick  is  categorical: “Women  see  government  as  their  insurance.”  (Perhaps  significantly,  of the  24 million  individuals  working  in  government  and  in  semi-governmental  non-profit  jobs,  14  million—58  percent—are  women.)

—The Richmond Times Dispatch, December 5, 1996

THE REST.