Category Archives: South-Africa

Why Hatred Of Whites Is Here To Stay

Africa, America, Colonialism, Crime, Democracy, History, Race, Racism, South-Africa

Why Hatred of Whites Is Here to Stay” is the current column, now on The Daily Caller. An excerpt:

Not so long ago, mere mention of the deliberate murder of whites in South Africa—country folk and commercial farmers, in particular—was called “racist.” “Raaacist!” the media collective brayed when candidate Trump retweeted a related “white genocide” hashtag.

It’s still “racist” to suggest that the butchering of these whites, almost daily, in ways that beggar belief, is racially motivated. Positively scandalous is it to describe the ultimate goal of a killing spree, now in its third decade, thus: the ethnic cleansing of white, farming South Africa from land the community has cultivated since the 1600s.

Be thankful for small mercies: At least the international media monopoly is finally reporting facts, such as that just the other day Andre and Lydia Saaiman, aged 70, were hacked to death in Port Elizabeth. (Imagine being chopped up until you expire.)

Or, that the elderly Bokkie Potgieter was dealt a similar fate as he tended his small, KwaZulu-Natal holding. Potgeiter was butchered during the October “Black Monday” protest, which was a nation-wide demonstration to end the carnage. Internationally reported as well were the facts of Sue Howarth’s death. The 64-year-old pharmaceutical executive was tortured for hours with … a blowtorch.

This black-on-white murder spree has been ongoing since a dominant-party political dispensation (mobocracy) was “negotiated in my homeland for South Africans. (Learn about “The American Architects of The South-African Catastrophe.“) But while the criminal evidence is at last out in the open, the motive for these hate crimes is only mumbled about for fear of offending the offenders.

In South Africa we find a criminal class, born into freedom after 1994, that burns with white-hot hatred for whites.

Why? …

… READ THE REST. Why Hatred of Whites Is Here to Stay” is now on The Daily Caller.

You can read the Mercer Column weekly on the Daily Caller, Unz Review, WND.com, occasionally on Townhall.com, and certainly on the other fine outlets listed here. It’s always posted, eventually, on IlanaMercer.com, under Articles. Please share.

Black Monday Marks Mourning & Protest Over Farm Murders In South Africa

Crime, Criminal Injustice, Race, Racism, South-Africa, The West

As I demonstrated in “Into The Cannibal’s Pot: Lessons for America From Post-Apartheid South Africa,” the Indian and white minorities are the disproportionate targets of crime in South Africa.

Today is Black Monday in South Africa, which sees  Steve Hofmeyr appeal “for intervention for all victims, but especially [for] our South African women and children, black and white; and then for the single most dangerous job in the world – that of the South African commercial farmer.”

Mr. Hofmeyr is a great patriot, activist and voice for South Africa’s white farmers, facing extinction. I’d like to see patriots like Steve and Dan Roodt on every one of America’s vapid TV channels and online, over and over again, speaking stark facts to the world about the ethnic cleansing of white farming South Africa from its ancestral lands, farmed since the 1600s.

Quit interviewing the vanity personalities of the West on this topic. What do they know? Nothing! Let’s hear from men and women who’re in the thick of this unfathomable racial violence.

LISTEN HERE. OR LOOK:

UPDATED (10/24): South-African Law Gone From Roman-Dutch To Tribal

Africa, America, Justice, Law, South-Africa

Two South African farmers, not the brightest, were convicted of “intent to murder” for pranking a trespasser, to teach him a lesson. Farmers are being killed by trespassers like Mr. Victor Mlotshwa, who turn home-invaders if they see an opportunity. The two farmers, Willem Oosthuizen and Theo Martins Jackson, wanted to teach him a lesson that would stay with him next time he entertained trespassing or thought of graduating to the next level of property invasion.

Judge Segopotje Mphahlele, also not the brightest, found the two guilty of attempted murder. Is there even a higher court in South Africa, manned with the kind of minds that might be able to explain to the country the imperative to overturn this silly judge’s verdict?

The “victim” was frightened but uninjured. Where is evidence of the intent to kill? Where’s mens rea?

Willem Oosthuizen and Theo Martins Jackson … were also found guilty of kidnapping, intimidation, and assault with intent to do grievous bodily harm.

If the trespasser was on the farmers’ property, how was this a kidnapping?

Dan Roodt provides comment:

It’s a travesty of justice. A simple prank out of frustration that the police offer no protection against trespassers, thieves and murderers becomes “attempted murder”. It was also trial by media and social media, because the cellphone video went viral. So it is mob justice, a cyber-mob but mob justice all the same. The black judge got carried away by all the cries of racism. He should have been more even-handed and fair, like a real judge. Every white South African should be worried after this: you could be the next accused and you will not receive a fair trial. After this, I am very worried about our courts.

There is an excellent section in Into The Cannibal’s Pot about the Courts. It dissects judgments rendered and shows how the law of the land is being ‘Indigenized’ (page 75).

UPDATE (10/24): “Culturally Incompetent To Stand Trial”:


American law:

Milton Friedman Understood Rhodesia In 1976

Africa, Britain, Colonialism, Communism, Race, South-Africa

VIA AFRICA UNAUTHORIZED:

“Of the 49 countries in Africa, fifteen are under direct military rule and 29 have one-party civilian governments. Only five have multiparty political systems. I have just returned from visiting two of these five—the Republic of South Africa and Rhodesia (the other three, for Africa buffs, are Botswana, Gambia and Mauritius). If this way of putting it produces a double take, that is its purpose. The actual situation in both South Africa and Rhodesia is very different from and very much more complex than the black-white stereotypes presented by both our government and the press. And the situation in Rhodesia is very different from that in South Africa.

Neither country is an ideal democracy—just as we are not. Both have serious racial problems— just as we have. Both can be justly criticized for not moving faster to eliminate discrimination— just as we can. But both provide a larger measure of freedom and affluence for all their residents—black and white—than most other countries of Africa.

Both would be great prizes for the Soviets—and our official policy appears well designed to assure that the Soviets succeed in following up their victory in Angola through the use of Cuban troops by similar take-overs in Rhodesia and South Africa.

The United Nations recently renewed and strengthened its sanctions against Rhodesia. The U.S. regrettably concurred. We have, however, had enough sense to continue buying chrome from Rhodesia under the Byrd amendment, rather than, as we did for a time, in effect forcing Rhodesia to sell its chrome to Russia (also technically a party to the sanctions) which promptly sold us chrome at double the price.

Rhodesia was opened up to the rest of the world less than a century ago by British pioneers. Since then, Rhodesia has developed rapidly, primarily through its mineral production—gold, copper, chrome and such—and through highly productive agriculture.

In the past two decades alone, the “African” (i.e., black) population has more than doubled, to 6 million, while the “European” population (i.e., white) has less than doubled, from about 180,000 to less than 300,000. As Rhodesia has developed, more and more Africans have been drawn from their traditional barter economy into the modern market sector. For example, from 1958 to 1975, the total earnings of African employees quadrupled, while those of European employees a little more than tripled. Even so, perhaps more than half of all Africans are still living in the traditional subsistence sector. …”

… READ THE REST: “Rhodesia in 1976. A fascinating view from a famous economist.”