UPDATED (3/6/019): Acceptance Into Medical School Depends Greatly On Race, Not Necessarily Aptitude

Affirmative Action,Education,Egalitarianism,Gender,Intelligence,Race

How did he get into very good medical schools with subpar scores (3.1 GPA)? Vijay Chokal-Ingam, who’s of Indian heritage, studied his chances of admission while Indian—and then resolved to pretend to be … African-American. Voila!

Admission into medical school is determined by the applicants GPA (Grade Point Average) and MCAT (the Medical College’s Admission Test), explains Tucker Carlson. The standard, however, differs by the appearance of the candidates.

(Here is a new “MCAT conversion table.”)

Asians with an MCAT of 27 to 29 and a GPA of 3.4 to 3.49 have only a 21% chance of getting into a medical school. A white with that score has a 29% of acceptance.

African-American applicants have an 81% chance of acceptance with these scores.

IF YOU’RE HISPANIC, you have a 60% probability of being accepted with such scores. (Tucker did not explain that respectable scores of 27 to 29 place the candidate in the 61st to 73rd percentile.)

An African-American candidate was 4 times more likely to be admitted to medical school than an Asian with the same MCAT scores.

If only Tucker had surveyed the degree to which women of all races trump men in the medical school selection.

(I also believe aptitude tests have been modified over the decades to address what the egalitarians insist is “racially biased Questions in standardized tests.” But I don’t have the literature to show this dumbing down over the decades.)

RELATED: “MCAT and GPA Grid for Applicants and Acceptees by Selected Race and Ethnicity, 2013-2014 through 2015-2016 (Aggregated).”

UPDATED (3/6/019): “When Merit-Based Hiring Is Deemed Racist, Bridges Fall Down“:

The U.S. government hasn’t had an entrance test since … 1982. It abandoned both the Federal Civil Service Entrance Examination and the Professional and Administrative Career Examination (PACE) because blacks and Latinos were much less likely to pass either of them.

In academia, law schools have lowered the bar in admissions and on the bar exam. Universities run a “dual admissions system”—“one admissions pool for white applicants and another, far less competitive, pool for minorities.”