Easy Street For Bernie; For Trump It’s A Horribly Hard Row To Hoe

Democrats,Donald Trump,Intellectualism,Intelligence,Paleolibertarianism,Republicans

The Trump Revolution: The Donald’s Creative Destruction Deconstructed must be quite a good read. I’ve caught my husband red-handed with a copy and a big grin on his face (unusual—the grin, I mean—since he works for Microsoft).

And, of course, Jack Kerwick is mining The Donald’s Creative Destruction. Most reviewers seek confirmation of their worldview in a work. If they find an unknown quantity; the ego gets in the way of dealing. Kerwick is unusual in his intellectual curiosity, never afraid to joust with ideas, never threatened by them.

The dangers of being too open about Trump in conservative circles don’t deter him either. (Actually, some conservative websites are proving very competitive in the marketplace of ideas—their young millennial editors adapting to the new political landscape and embracing renegades far quicker than some libertarian sites. Kudos.)

In any case, in his latest TownHall column, Kerwick uses The Trump Revolution to drive home an important point I’ve not heard made before: “Bernie Sanders Is No Donald Trump.” To listen to the moron media, you’d think otherwise.

… For obvious reasons, this libertarian defense of the Trump process—the first of its kind—couldn’t be timelier. There is, however, another reason as to why it’s so critically important to read The Trump Revolution.

Contrary to conventional wisdom, Bernie Sanders is not the Democrats’ counterpart to Trump. This is among the many points that Mercer makes in her fine work. Consider the following:

The difference, though, is that Trump has exposed—and defeated—this corruption.

Sanders, in glaring contrast, has acquiesced in it, for he is now urging his supporters—who, by the sounds of it, are much more principled than he—into voting for Hillary Clinton.

Secondly, Sanders hardly accomplished what Trump has accomplished—and what Trump continues to accomplish. Sanders won 22 states in his contest against Clinton. But it was only a two person race, he had been a politician in the Senate for nearly a quarter of a century, had virtually nothing but good press, and his rallies weren’t repeatedly disrupted by violent thugs.

Trump, on the other hand, a business mogul and “reality TV star,” came out of nowhere. Derided and marginalized by “the experts,” this “clown” and “buffoon,” a million-to-one-shot underdog, slayed 16 of the GOP’s best and brightest, including some of its most popular senators and governors. These were the party’s rock stars—and Trump relegated them to the ranks of the Has Beens one after the other. …

Kerwick counts 7 major differences between what the brave-heart Trump has endured—Trump still has a horribly hard row to hoe ahead—as compared to Sanders’s easy street, and ends the column thus:

Bernie Sanders has had nothing like the bumpy road that Trump has had to travel. Ilana Mercer compares the two in her own inimical way: Sanders is “a mouse of a man” compared to the “masculine force at full tilt” that is Trump.