Category Archives: Kids

Rob Shimshock’s First Book Promises To Be Wonderfully Unwoke

Conservatism, English, Free Speech, Kids, Literature, Paleoconservatism, Race, THE ELITES

I look forward to gaining insight into the mind of a young American writer, who’s on the wrong side of creation (pale male), to say nothing of the issues (non-woke)—ilana mercer

A young dissident, editor Rob Shimshock, is already up against The Amazon Machine, in his attempt to advertise his first book, Nightmare Crescendo: Breaking the Chokehold of Woke Capital. He tweets,

AmazonAds suspended an ad campaign for my new book, for being controversial and having…incorrect capitalization. Incorrect according to what, the AP, which insists you capitalize “black” but not “white”?

Fortunately, “the book,” Rob tells me, “is still up — and got a rank of #1, in a few, new-release categories and top 5 across the board in some others — but working with Advertising has been a pain. Amazon most recently denied one of my ads for an alleged incorrect use of ‘whose’… either this guy didn’t pass 4th grade English or was just that desperate to fabricate something to nuke the ad.”

I’m a stickler for grammar, as is Rob, my editor. I don’t see Rob’s errors anywhere. Besides, from the perspective of the drones working behind “Woke Capital,” isn’t it total racism to finger a writer for bad grammar? By the Amazon-advanced woke standards, English must be fluid if it is to avoid racism.

I look forward to receiving my review copy. For a book about politics, this almost sounds like fun—and is certainly a window in the mind of a young American writer, who is on the wrong side of creation (pale male), to say nothing of the issues. Read:

In his first book, journalist Rob Shimshock dissects the sinister symphony of academia, the media, the Deep State, Hollywood, Woke Capital, and their Soros-funded footsoldiers, a mesh of macabre melodies dragging our planet into the abyss. Shimshock diagnoses the sickness and offers antidotes through a series of literary “nocturnes” featuring bite-sized allegories like a battle between the Twitter bluebird and the U.S. eagle, blistering diatribes on the “cosmopolitan palate” and libertarian “Trojan whores,” admonitions against profit-driven “pathogenerals” and reprobate resisters to his 18th Amendment prohibition gang, a game manual for MONOPOLY: Regime Change edition, an ICE reality TV show pitch, and, yes, even a press release for the new superhero Dr. Deedee O. Hess, whose kooky finesse with hacking and leaking below-the-belt selfies of Big Tech CEOs is unrivaled.

Dictators loathe the sound of laughter. But they are terrified when that glee meets a formidable strategy. The Nightmare Crescendo has grown louder than ever before. Are you ready to become the instrument of its demise?

*Image courtesy Cassandra Fairbanks

When A Mountain Of Flesh, Ma’Khia Bryant, Attacks …

Crime, Justice, Kids, Law, Natural Law, Race, Racism

When a mountain of feral flesh, Ma’Khia Bryant, attacks with what appears to be an intent to kill another—a concept is conjured from the Idiot’s arsenal to blame uninvolved whites, and their society at large.

Black girls, explains the New York Times’ resident idiot, have a “unique burden”:

In media coverage, Ms. Bryant has consistently been referred to as a woman, and her behavior and her body size have been scrutinized to suggest that she presented a large, uncontainable threat to everyone at the scene.

“It’s called adultification bias.”

Hard to keep up with how stupid and immoral America has become.

In reality, “Officer Nicholas Reardon’s body camera shows Bryant with a knife in hand, lunging towards a young woman who is pinned against a car. As Bryant reaches back with the knife, Reardon fires four shots.”

That cuddly “kid” was about to kill. She needed killing.

NEW COLUMN: A Christmas Story Before Nerf Guns Became a No-No

Christianity, Comedy & Humor, Family, Feminism, Film, Founding Fathers, Kids, Left-Liberalism

NEW COLUMN, “A Christmas Story Before Nerf Guns Became a No-No,” is on American Greatness.

An excerpt:

Described by a critic as “one of those rare movies you can say is perfect in every way,” “A Christmas Story,” directed by Bob Clark, debuted in 1983. Set in the 1940s, the film depicts a series of family vignettes through the eyes of 9-year-old Ralphie Parker, who yearns for that gift of all gifts: The Daisy Red Ryder BB gun.

This was boyhood before the Nerf gun and “bang-bang you’re dead” were banned; family life prior to “One Dad Two Dads Brown Dad Blue Dads,” and Christmas before Saint Nicholas was denounced for his whiteness, and “Merry Christmas” condemned for its exclusiveness.

If children could choose the family into which they were born, most would opt for the kind depicted in “A Christmas Story,” where mom is a happy homemaker, dad a devoted working stiff, and between them, they have zero repertoire of progressive psychobabble to rub together.

Although clearly adored, Ralphie is not encouraged to share his feelings at every turn. Nor is he, in the spirit of gender-neutral parenting, circa 2020, urged to act out like a girl if he’s feeling … girlie.

Instead, Ralphie is taught restraint and self-control. And horrors: The little boy even has his mouth washed out with soap and water for uttering the “F” expletive. “My personal preference was for Lux,” reveals Ralphie, “but I found Palmolive had a nice piquant, after-dinner flavor—heady but with just a touch of mellow smoothness.” Ralphie is, of course, guilt-tripped with stories about starving Biafrans when he refuses to finish his food.

The parenting practiced so successfully by Mr. and Mrs. Parker fails every progressive commandment. By today’s standards, the delightful, un-precocious protagonist of “A Christmas Story” would be doomed to a lifetime on the therapist’s chaise lounge—and certainly to daily doses of Ritalin …

NEW COLUMN, “A Christmas Story Before Nerf Guns Became a No-No,” is on American Greatness.

Merry Christmas.

On Motherhood

Debt, Ethics, Family, Gender, Kids, Morality

Via LinkedIn (where you can join me, too):

On being a mother: A little long, but still achingly poignant. Every single mother can identify:

Related reading is “Are you My Mother?”

Emily Wilson, a classicist, offers these insights:

“There is a deeply rooted idea in our culture that mothers, far more than fathers, are responsible not just for picking up the toys and changing the nappies, but also for how the child turns out in the end, for good or ill.”

Ms. Wilson’s conclusion:

“Mothers are all different, because they are all human. The good enough mother is one who gives her child what it needs to grow up. The good enough child is one who manages to grow up, and in doing so, is able to recognize her mother’s humanity.”