Category Archives: China

FRED REED: Fairies, Poltergeists, Incubi & Libertad de la Prensa: The Delusion of Free Speech

China, Constitution, FRED REED, Free Speech, Government, Individual Rights, Private Property, Technology

How much does [Big Tech censorship] differ from censorship in, say, China? Answer: In China people know they are watched. There is nothing subtle about it. How many Americans are really aware of the foregoing?

BY FRED REED

When a government does not itself impose censorship people may think they have freedom of speech, or can be made to think they do, even though they don’t. In America, the government does not need to, uh, “redact.“ Private entities—credit card companies, social media, search engines and so on—do for government what it cannot do openly for itself: Prevent expression of inappropriate thought.

Many believe that the First Amendment guarantees this freedom, if they have heard of the First Amendment. But the Amendment does not apply to private companies. It doesn’t have to. The huge corporations, not just the social media but financial services and mainstream outlets, can censor, directly or indirectly, as they like. “As they like” invariably means “as the formal government,” of which they are in effect branches, like.

Herewith some examples. For quite a while this column was homeported at the Unz Review. The site has now been heavily censored. Recently I asked Ron Unz, the owner, what happened. His response:

Sure, Fred.  Basically, we were banned from Facebook (i.e. nothing
containing unz.com can appear there or even be sent in private
messages).  More importantly, all our pages were “deranked” from every
Google search, meaning they’re now absolutely at the bottom of all
search results…Not only was our rudimentary Facebook page eliminated, but all subsequent attempts to  post our articles to the world’s largest social network produced an error message describing the content as “abusive.” Our entire website had been banned.

The Review is not calculated to make friends with everybody, among other things being obsessively and, I would say imaginatively, hostile to Jews, but this is hardly uncommon, and the site has never advocated violence, implicitly or otherwise,  against anyone. The whole idea of freedom of the press was to protect expression of ideas regardless of who liked them.

Then there is American Renaissance, a white advocacy site that urges no crime, (again) explicitly or implicitly. Follow the link and see for yourself if so inclined. It talks about such things as black crime, unrestricted immigration, and argues that affirmative action lowers standards. You may not agree with all of its ideas—I don’t—or any of them. But they are mainstream ideas held by tens of millions and deal with political questions of large importance.

I asked Jared Taylor, the webmaster and a graduate of Yale in philosophy with additionally a diplôme in international relations from l’institut d’études politiques de Paris about censorship of the site and of himself. His response:

Dear Fred,

The list is long. This is what I recall:

Facebook: my personal account and the AmRen account were canceled.

Twitter: my personal account and AmRen account.

PayPal:  my personal account and AmRen account.

YouTube: Our video and podcast channels.

Amazon: Almost all of our books, both print and Kindle are banned. Also, we were unable to use special programs for non-profits because Amazon consults and abides by an SPLS list of “bad” non-profits.

Google: Almost always fails to include our pages in search results. Contrast with Duck Duck Go is striking.

Credit card processors: I don’t know how many — maybe eight or ten? — have refused to do business with us.

Email servers: Four or five but all the big ones, such as MailChimp and Constant Contact.

Advertising: Google ads, and every mainstream internet ad service.

Printshop: Our local printer of 20 years, Instyprints, decided what we were printing was intolerable…If you try to include an AmRen link in a tweet or Facebook post the recipient will get a nasty warning that AmRen could be a fraudulent or phishing site.”

This sort of thing is done to many. Question: How much does it differ from censorship in, say, China? Answer: In China people know they are watched. There is nothing subtle about it. How many Americans are really aware of the foregoing?

An argument of sorts could be made that with divisions as sharp as currently exist in America, nothing that might increase antagonism should be published. But this standard is not applied to, say, BLM. American censorship is purely partisan. Exactly as it is in China.

You may not like Donald Trump. I don’t. But when a few men at the top of the social media can censor a major politician with a huge following of almost half of the electorate and a former president, it is what the First Amendment intended to prevent. It is legal, though, because the companies are private. If Biden tried to do this by executive order, all hell would break loose.  In the past newspapers were as biased, but there might be five papers in a city, so you had contending biases. Now we have five national newspapers—Google, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and the Wikipedia—all thinking the same thing and all, I suspect, with CEOs socializing among themselves.

The major media also are tightly controlled, but rely on the principle that when people get used to something, they don’t notice it. Note that the media  allow nothing in favor of the Second Amendment or Trump, against abortion, Israel, sexual aberrations, or immigration, about black crime or racial intelligence. Coverage of the wars is so slight as to constitute censorship, especially of coverage that would make the carnage evident. Military industry and its gigantic cost are strikingly unpresent. The police are never allowed to present their side of events. You can be fired for using the wrong word or phonemes, even if it was fifteen years ago in a private email—and email is forever: You can never tell when it will surface to bite you. Think Synopticon.

Violeta likes to watch television series on Netflix from around the world from an interest in the general tenor of life overseas: South America, China, Japan, South Korea. (All have Spanish subtitles.) All the Chinese series, she reports, have disappeared. With Washington whumping up war fever against Beijing, presumably it thought undesirable that Americans see the Chinese as attractive people greatly more moral than Americans. Mommy knows best.

The granularity of censorship becomes ever finer. I am a minor hobbyist columnist of no importance with several thousand subscribers. For maybe twenty years I had an entry on the Wikipedia. (Fred Reed ) It is now gone. I had I’ll guess between twenty and thirty photos of me that appeared if you Googled on “Fred Reed” and clicked on images. Most are gone. I don’t suggest that the world yearns to look at me, but to point out that a largely unknown and unimportant columnist is thought worth censoring. My disappearance may have been accomplished algorithmically or by some woke 22-year-old twerp editing at the Wikipedia—I doubt that I rank high in the consciousness of Mark Zuckerberg–but it happened.

The Wikipedia, a major source for much of the population, is heavily censored regarding taboo topics. Search on “race and intelligence” or something similar. It is of great important to society, answering such questions as whether lower outcomes for a particular race are the result of discrimination or of lower ability. A great deal of careful scientific research has been done on this, including IQ, neurological, and so on.

When I made the suggested search, the first entry began with something like, “claims of different levels of intelligence have been used to promote hate, etc.,” and the second with the assertion that race has no biological meaning.”

Hitler’s Mein Kampf is a major historical document crucial to understanding the events of the last century. While fascinating to the educated, it would be intensely boring to the ignorant and those under thirty in America, given the dimming of the schools. It certainly isn’t inflammatory. I listened to all of it in an excellent translation from Audible.com without instigating a single pogrom.

The Audible version is now gone, and Amazon does not have it in any format.

Mein Kampf Audible Amazon has only a book of Hitler’s speeches: Amazon. You can bet it has been appropriately edited.

But, as Bush I said, the world hates us for our freedoms. Uh-huh. Sho’ nuff.

Read Fred’s Books! Or else. We know where you sleep.

******************************************

FRED REED describes himself as [previously] a “Washington police reporter, former Washington editor for Harper’s and staff writer for Soldier of Fortune magazine, Marine combat vet from Viet Nam, and former long-haul hitchhiker, part-time sociopath, who once lived in Arlington, Virginia, across the Potomac River from the Yankee Capital.”
His essays “on the collapse of America” Mr. Reed calls “wildly funny, sometimes wacky, always provocative.”
“Fred is the Hunter Thompson of the right,” seconds Thomas E. Ricks in Foreign Policy magazine. His  commentary is “well-written, pungent political incorrectness mixed with smart military commentary and libertarian impulses, topped off with a splash of Third World sunshine and tequila.”

FRED’S BOOKS ARE ON AMAZON, HERE

FRED’S ARTICLES ARCHIVE

Killer Kink

Hardboiled is back! (The exclamation point is to arouse wild enthusiasm int the reader, a boiling literary lust.) Gritty crime fiction by longtime police reporter for the Washington Times, who knows the police from nine years of riding with them. Guaranteed free of white wine and cheese, sensitivity, or social justice.

 

 

UPDATE II (7/24/022): NEW COLUMN: Crappy Conservative Thinking: Protecting Power, Not Freedom (On ‘Manners, Solid Values & A Soul’)

China, Conservatism, Kids, Pop-Culture, Republicans, Sex

NEW COLUMN is “Crappy Conservative Thinking: Protecting Power, Not Freedom.” It’s a feature on WND.COM, The Unz Review, and on The New American, Friday.

Excerpt:

DID YOU notice the theme on the Tucker Carlson Tonight, July 18? Tucker Carlson got into TikTok mode, blaming China for pervasive American decadence, decades in the making.

The host petulantly saddled China and its algorithms for, among other things, America’s gutter culture, as acted out on TikTok.

If we are to believe Mr. Carlson, the Chinese made those Americans hos disrobe and simulate all manner of sex on TikTok. The Chinese made American TikTokers gesticulate and grunt and generally privilege Ebonics over English. And the Chinese made the same pornographic performers worship hip-hop and rap and energetically deploy their lower bodies to signal mating behavior that jibes with that of primates.

A non sequitur is when your argument’s conclusion does not follow from its premise. Milking illogic to incriminate China for cultural trends that pervade mainstream America culture—why, Laura Ingraham herself professed her love for the rap hump-a-long genre—Tucker offered up his proof for the blame-China thesis:

Chinese TikTokers are seen practicing piano, manners and magic cube mental skills, whereas Americans can be observed doing what they do on … TV, in the movies, on reality shows, on campuses from kindergarten to college and on political panels.

Say no more. Point proven (mine). QED. Doing dumb and degenerate has become the Alpha and Omega of American life. TikTok reflects not Chinese machinations, but the broader American culture.

China’s culture until Communism was Confucian, which is high-minded and genteel. And, contra ConOink (my variation on ConInc), China is reactionary, returning not to Communism, but to Confucianism.

America’s youth, enabled by indulgent and permissive parents and pedagogues, have become increasingly licentious, lippy and libertine. Most are ignorant and lousy at writing, reasoning, and conversing coherently about anything other than raaaaaacism and, “Like my sexuality.” The kids have also become un-moored from their finest traditions, which are being embraced by …the Chinese: They are returning to things classical, traditional and eternally and universally beautiful.

You don’t see many of China’s youth act out in estrus, because they can’t. China has banned corrupt hip-hop culture, and has a new export: Western classical music.

“Once, classical music generally traveled from the West to the rest,” marveled the Economist. “Now China is reversing the exchange, not merely performing Western classical music in China, but exporting it. …”

In China, they’re inclined to consider a youth-obsessed society such as ours a silly society. The standard inquiry, among Taiwanese engineers, I am told, about their American counterparts in hardware engineering is, “How many grey hairs and no-hairs are in the group?” Unlike their youth-worshiping American colleagues, these wise instinctual Confucians reason that the presence of “grey hairs and no-hairs” in the collaborating high-tech team bodes better for the project.

On the other hand, “in America,” as Oscar Wilde had observed, “the young are always ready to give to those who are older than themselves the full benefits of their inexperience.” And adults are always on-hand to facilitate their folly.

From Fox News we move to LinkedIn for a snapshot of the Zeitgeist

… READ THE REST. NEW COLUMN is “Crappy Conservative Thinking: Protecting Power, Not Freedom,” now on IlanaMercer.com

* My “I might be a Chinese spy” look is suitable for this subversive material.

UPDATED (7/22/022): My batting average. Every week, over 22 years, the likes of these come in:

Hi Ilana,

This is excellent: https://www.wnd.com/2022/07/crappy-conservative-thinking-protecting-power-not-freedom/   One of Wnd’s best over the past few months. Way to go!

Brian D. Ray, Ph.D.
President
National Home Education Research Institute (NHERI)
Editor-in-Chief
Home School Researcher (peer-reviewed journal)

UPDATE II (7/24/022):  On “manners, solid values and a soul”: Some men like to break a warrior down. Others take the time to do their part in propping her up. Chivalry among men is on life support, but is not entirely dead. I don’t get the reader’s French, but appreciate his kindness. 

—–Original Message—–
From: es
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 5:51 AM
To: ilana mercer <ilana@ilanamercer.com>
Subject: the chinese spy look

Love it!

You should run for something. Good looks n’est-pas la seule chose, c’est toute chose, d’accord?

Wait, I take that back. You have brains, manners, solid values and soul.

You’d lose in a landslide.

ES

Tucker Carlson Gets Into Tiktok Mode, Blames China For Pervasive American Decadence

China, Communism, Conservatism, Logic, Pop-Culture, Reason, Sex, The Zeitgeist

Notice the theme on the Tucker Carlson Show today, July 18?

Tucker mindlessly blames China for, among other things, America’s gutter culture, as acted out on Tiktok. Accordingly, the Chinese made Americans worship hip hop and rap and twerk. The Chinese made American hos disrobe and simulate sex on TikTok. The Chinese made American Tiktokers privilege Ebonics over English.

Heavily into non sequitur mode, for the cultural trends Tucker blamed on China are mainstream American culture (Laura Ingraham loves rap by admission)–Tucker presented the proof to his blame-China thesis: Chinese Tiktokers are seen practicing piano, manners and magic cube mental skills, whereas Americans are seen doing what they do on TV, in movies, on reality shows, and on political panels.

Say no more. I’ve proved my point. QED.

China’s culture until communism was Confucianism, which is high-minded and genteel. And, contra ConOink, China is reactionary, returning to Confucianism; not Communism:

CNN’s Sinophobic Zakaria Is Clueless: China Is Reactionary, Returning To Confucianism; Not Communism

Enabled by indulgent and permissive parents and pedagogues, America’s youth have become increasingly licentious, lippy and libertine. Most are ignorant and lousy at writing, reasoning, and conversing coherently about anything other than raaaaaacism. They have also become un-moored from their finest traditions. The Chinese—who seem to know what’s good—are returning to things classical, traditional and eternally and universally beautiful.

Having banned corrupt hip-hop culture, China has a new export: Western classical music. “Once, classical music generally traveled from the West to the rest,” marvels the Economist. “Now China is reversing the exchange, not merely performing Western classical music in China, but exporting it. …

 

FRED REED: Musket And The Noodle Stall: A Strategic Comparison

America, Asia, China, Economy, FRED REED, Military, Trade

BY FRED REED

In big-chunk terms, in the world today we see a contest between the Chinese economy and the American military, between Chinese dynamism and American coercion. Sure, China has a military and the US has an economy. Yet the emphasis, and spirit are as described.

The United States gives priority to the military over civilian economy, with military spending increasing at the expense of internal infrastructure and social needs. By contrast, China focuses on infrastructure within and trade without. I wonder whether Americans are aware of the extent of this. And its likely consequences.

To read the Asian-based press—Asia Times, Nikkei Asia, the South China Morning Post, the Global Times, and various tech sites—is to see a constant stream of infrastructure projects in China and advancing trade outside.  As perhaps many know China promotes the Belt and Road Initiative, a massive program to connect all of Eurasia, as well as Africa and Latin America in a huge trade zone connected by rail, highways, fiber optics, maritime links, and commercial treaties. If completed it will dwarf the United States.

China, a rising technological center, leads the world in civil engineering, manufacturing, Five G, trade, and clearly intends to maintain the lead. All power ultimately rests on economic power. Below a few news stories more or less randomly chosen from around the web. Can you think of American equivalents?

China Mandalay Rail Line

“New international railway route from Southwest China’s Chongqing Municipality to Mandalay, southern Myanmar, has officially started operation, with the first freight train departing from Chongqing on Monday, which will arrive in Mandalay about 20 days earlier than what it takes on traditional routes.”The port will also further connectivity under the Belt and Road Initiative and increase Chinese influence in Myanmar. Key word: Trade.

America leads in phenomenally expensive aircraft carriers with serious developmental problems and no particular purpose. Google “Ford class carriers.”

China’s high-speed rail network hit the 40,000-kilometer mark by the end of 2021, reaching out to 93 percent of domestic cities with a population of over 500,000, An Lusheng, deputy head of National Railway Administration, said on Friday. This comes as the country ramps up a push to build itself into a transportation power.”

Fast, pervasive transportation greatly facilitates almost everything. Beijing has said it will have 30,000 miles in a few years. key words: manufacturing, trade, connectivity.

The first China-Russia highway bridge, which stretches from Heihe, a border city in Northeast China’s Heilongjiang Province, to the Russian city of Blagoveshchensk spanning the Heilongjiang River, opened to traffic on Friday, Chinese state broadcaster CCTV reported. It will open a new international highway that will boost the connectivity between cities in China and Russia.“ A few days ago. Here we have more of China’s program to tie all of Eurasia into one interconnected web. Note that it says the “first” bridge. Key words: Trade, connectivity.

China plans new high-volume  space-launch facility

“The new Ningbo spaceport, the nation’s fifth such facility, will give a crucial lift to Beijing’s new space programs as its rivalry with the United States reaches space. The spaceport is said to be tailor-made for Chinese commercial aerospace manufacturers and service providers to one day wrest business and foreign orders from US rivals.”

Typical China. Planning five years in advance. If this follows the country’s pattern, construction will begin and continue without interruption until completed. Keyword: Commercial.

America leads world in overpriced fighter aircraft with history of unending engineering problems. Google “F-35.”

Cargo carried via New Land-Sea Corridor in western China grows 38% in Jan-May”

“With the RCEP coming into effect, the corridor has played a bigger role in boosting trade between China and ASEAN. On April 8, four trains left Southwest China’s Sichuan Province, carrying aluminum products, agricultural equipment, industrial equipment, chemicals and food to Laos, Thailand, Vietnam and Indonesia

The RCEP, Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership, is a vast commercial agreement among whose members are all of ASEAN, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, and China.”

Key word: Trade.

Multi-functional modular seabed trencher developed by a Chinese firm has recently completed 100 kilometers of pipelines construction in “Bangladesh’s first marine pipeline project, setting two world records in directional drilling and deep trenching.”

My knowledge of pipeline trenching would be zero even after three cups of coffee and a hearty breakfast. I note, though that it is in Bangladesh: More connection of China and everywhere else. It also sounds like good engineering. Key words: Trade, connectivity.

The CKU Railways will create significant trade opportunities for Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan while linking China directly to the Middle East via Rail, with spin off benefits throughout the region.”

China, Kyrgyzstan, and Uzbekistan will be tied more into the Central Asian ecosystem. Construction begins next year. Key words: Trade, connectivity.

America is unchallenged in funny-looking Batplane intercontinental nuclear bomber costing, says Aviation Week, $640 million a copy as America prepares to fill intense world demand for nuclear war. Google “B-21.”

 The China-Laos Railway: Yunnan to Vientiane by Bullet Train

Written by Coco Yang Updated Feb. 11, 2022

On December 3rd 2021, the 1,035-km (643-mile) China-Laos Railway was fully opened making possible a bullet train journey of only 10 hours from Kunming to Vientiane, capital of Laos. Key word: Trade.

China-Europe freight train trips top 50,000, yearly growth of 55% from 2016 to 2021

“The value of goods transported by the cargo service skyrocketed to $74.9 billion in 2021, up from $8 billion dollars in 2016, and its share in total trade between China and Europe has increased from 1.5 to 8 percent, according to the release China State Railway Group sent to the Global Times.” America will probably try to block this traffic because it goes through Russia. Again, coercion over competition. Key word: Trade, connectivity.

Proposed US military budget: $857 billion. Keywords:  Profits, stupidity.

China Hosts over Sixty Percent of World’s Five G  Base Stations

“China had set up a total of nearly 1.43 million 5G base stations as of the end of 2021….”

And many more this year. As can be found by browsing tech sites, China leads in Five G patents, installed base, technology, and manufacturing capacity. Keywords: Trade, manufacturing.

Many millions of Americans can’t read, a hundred thousand a year die of opioid overdoses, the economy is a trainwreck, and despair grows, but the Pentagon has Space Command to give America “Total Spectrum Dominance,” which presumably will pay our mortgages.

China’s digital yuan extends usage into finance scenarios

“SHANGHAI, June 17 (Reuters) – China’s digital yuan can now be used to buy wealth management products, pay for insurance policies, and extend bank loans, as the central bank further expands e-CNY’s application beyond retail shopping, though still only in pilot schemes.”

China is the world’s leading major country in digital currency. Beijing is low-key about it but implications for global finance worry the US. Keywords: Money, connectivity.

US leads world in pricey, unnecessary but glamorous and profitable nuclear-missile submarines. Google “Columbia class submarines.”

China moves toward STEM leadership

Worth reading. “American” prowess in technology increasingly rests on East Asian and Indian scientists and engineers as the US destroys its schools to further inclusiveness. Keywords: Abject, stupidity.

Value of China-Vietnam Cross-border Freight Trains More Than Triples in Q1”

US has both largest military budget and largest number of citizens living on sidewalks.

China leader in supercomputers: “As of June 2021, 188 of the world’s 500 most powerful supercomputers were located in China, a figure which is a third more than that of its nearest competitor, the United States, which accounted for an additional 122 supercomputers. Together, the two nations account for around 60 percent of the world’s most powerful supercomputers.”

This needs to be read with caution. How the two stack up in aggregate computing power, whatever that means, I don’t know. The US just announced the first exascale computer at Oak Ridge. The Sunway Oceanlight from China is on many websites said to be exascale, but isn’t quite. The important point is that it is entirely of Chinese design from architecture to chips, using silicon of Chinese design and manufacture. It is remarkable that China can manage this in the face of American attempts to strangle the country technologically.

China Launches World’s Largest container Ship

A gorgeous monster. Check photo. China also has seven of the world’s largest cargo ports. Keyword: Trade

Trade deficit with China. Boring but worth a glance.

“During 2021, the United States exported $151,065,200,000 in products to China, but then imported $506,366,900,000 in products from China, resulting in $657,432,100,000 in total trade between the two countries–and a $355,301,700,000 deficit for the United States.”

Keyword: Can you guess?

Read Fred’s Books! Or else. We know where you sleep.

******************************************

FRED REED describes himself as [previously] a “Washington police reporter, former Washington editor for Harper’s and staff writer for Soldier of Fortune magazine, Marine combat vet from Viet Nam, and former long-haul hitchhiker, part-time sociopath, who once lived in Arlington, Virginia, across the Potomac River from the Yankee Capital.”
His essays “on the collapse of America” Mr. Reed calls “wildly funny, sometimes wacky, always provocative.”
“Fred is the Hunter Thompson of the right,” seconds Thomas E. Ricks in Foreign Policy magazine. His  commentary is “well-written, pungent political incorrectness mixed with smart military commentary and libertarian impulses, topped off with a splash of Third World sunshine and tequila.”

FRED’S BOOKS ARE ON AMAZON, HERE

FRED’S ARTICLES ARCHIVE

Killer Kink

Hardboiled is back! (The exclamation point is to arouse wild enthusiasm int the reader, a boiling literary lust.) Gritty crime fiction by longtime police reporter for the Washington Times, who knows the police from nine years of riding with them. Guaranteed free of white wine and cheese, sensitivity, or social justice.