Category Archives: COVID-19

UPDATED (10/23): NEW COLUMN: Actually, COVID Comes Courtesy Of The Chinese PEOPLE

China, Conservatism, Conspiracy, COVID-19, Culture, Environmentalism & Animal Rights, Ethics, Multiculturalism, Neoconservatism

NEW COLUMN IS “Actually, COVID Comes Courtesy Of The Chinese PEOPLE.” It appeared on WND.COM, The Unz Review, Quarterly Review, and NAEBC.

An excerpt:

China’s plague-delivery pedigree is solid.

Courtesy of China, the West got the H2N2 virus in 1957 and the H3N2 virus in 1968. Granted, the Chinese viral supply chain was broken with H1N1 flu; it came from Mexico. But, with the bird flu, SARS and SARS-Cov-2, China has fully reestablished its disease-delivery credentials.

Alas, going by the COVID culpability theories advanced by conservatives, the steady stream of “China plagues,” in Trump’s words, has had nothing to do with the noble Chinese people.

Blame the ignoble Chinese Communist Party for all these lethal, little RNA strands unleashed on the world. Some even have taken to calling SARS-CoV-2 “the CCP virus.”

As this Disneyfied neoconservative narrative goes, the Chinese were just hanging, being the freedom-loving, civilized sorts they are; going about the business of making the world a better place, when, lo-and-behold, their scheming, communistic government sprung the COVID on them—and the world.

Without fail, American pundits and pols, conservatives, in particular, apply to China the same theories of culpability that have undergirded America’s invasions of the illiberal people of the Middle East.

The bifurcation globalists love to effect is of the noble Chinese people up against the ignoble Chinese government.

It’s the Chinese government, not the people. Liberate the Chinese and they’ll show their Jeffersonian propensity for enlightened self-interest, not to mention a palate for cuisine less craven and cruel.

What I wrote in 2006 about Iraqis applies in spades to the Chinese and their responsibility for COVID. I’ve substituted Iraq with China here:

“The government of [China] doesn’t stand apart from the governed; it reflects them.” (November 6, 2006) …

… READ THE REST. NEW COLUMN IS “COVID Comes Courtesy Of The Chinese PEOPLE.” It appeared on WND.COM, The Unz Review, Quarterly Review, and NAEBC.

  • Wet Markets, Courtesy of Jo-Anne McArthur

Bat soup, courtesy NAEBC, where the column is now posted.

Courtesy NAEBC.

UPDATE (10/23):

Sickest think, @rosenberger_ken, on LinkedIn, where we both hangout, is how animal rescues keep fetching (and filming) these half-starved dogs from dog-eating farms–yet animal activists say not a words about THAT cultural EVIL. About BLM, The same activists, on the same forum,  don’t shut up.

 

What About Deep Tech’s Infractions Will Change If We Vote Republican?

Business, COVID-19, Donald Trump, Law, Media, Outsourcing, Republicans, Technology

When President Trump talks, one can’t help but be impressed by his unbounded force, energy and excellent command of details, down to a Bill’s public law number. In this case, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act:

Bartiromo … asked Trump about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects social media companies from being legally liable for content on their networks published by users. Trump called it “a disgrace.”

Still, questioned he must be. Voters handed POTUS both legislative Chambers and the presidency for two years. Yet he and the GOP failed to strip Deep Tech of Section 230, …  which, to repeat, “protects social media companies from being legally liable for content on their networks published by users.”

(I use the Deep Tech coinage to better capture the power and reach of the high-tech monopolists in politics.)

What’ll change this time around, if we elect Republicans?

Moreover, small, independent entitles who suffer banning by social media (“MERCER DOMAINS BANNED BY DEEP TECH FACEBOOK“) cannot afford to sue conglomerates whose revenues are greater than “the GDP of four of the G20 nations.”

So what is the remedy for the powerless (check) who’ve been thrown off social media, for no good reason?

Speaking of one of the Five Big crooked Tech companies; Microsoft’s Bill Gates recently told Chris Wallace “that Trump’s travel ban may have worsened the coronavirus pandemic.”

Those who live a lie usually spout, at best, only half-truths. Trump’s travel ban after the unleashing of COVID was indeed worse than useless. Chinese were merely rerouted and their temperatures taken. But that’s because Mr. Gates “seeded the disease here,” by replacing American with Chinese workers and making these Chinese citizens who travel to-and-from Wuhan

FAKE NEWS’ New Frontier: Against Any Efficient Reallocation Of Resources

Argument, Classical Liberalism, COVID-19, Democrats, Economy, Government, Natural Law, Propaganda, The State

The deeply silly Washington post has one of its anti-Trump “scoops”: ICE special response teams were freed up to respond to the June riots, ongoing. OMG! You wouldn’t want to optimize the people’s resources to save their resources, now would you?

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) used a flight charter service reserved for the transportation of detainees to move tactical teams to Washington, D.C., to help quell protests on June 2 in the capital, according to a report by The Washington Post.
To justify the flights, ICE transported immigration detainees from facilities in Arizona and Florida to its Farmville, Va., immigration jail, a current and former official told the publication.

Skim and consider the natural law: Is it not naturally licit for personnel who serve the people to be moved around so that they may better serve the people in another, more-urgent capacity?

At issue here are state rules: Why do state rules prohibit efficient allocation of resources? Because that’s the very definition of the state: Perversely inefficient allocation of scarce resources.

As to COVID: I, too, am concerned with COVID-19 spread, but COVID-prevention protocols have nothing to do with freeing up Immigration and Customs Enforcement to deal with riots. These are two separate issues, conveniently conflated here.

Outsourcing Life To The Expert Class: The Menace Of The Managerial Class

COVID-19, Family, Government, Pop-Psychology, Psychiatry, The State

In James Burnham’s Managerial State, explains , “political power moves away from … institutions like Congress and toward the executive bureaucracy … The effect is the reduction of nonmanagerial political institutions to increasingly nominal status. Forms of ‘constitutionalism’ may still be permitted to exist, but the managerial elite does not derive its power or legitimacy from them. It can, therefore, easily manipulate or simply ignore these institutions while pursuing its own ends.”

The managerial elite has given us our dysfunctional, atomistic, fragmented society, where traditional support systems no longer exist. To pick up the slack we have the Expert Class.

In a way, the insidious Expert Class that shapes and manages perceptions about public affairs is an extension of the Managerial State. The expert class tends to remove moral and medical decisions from individuals, families, and communities of faith by medicalizing problems of living.

Once, big-on-the-military actor James Wood got word about a veteran who was about to shoot himself in some remote location. So he galvanized the … experts. He got him “help.” He outsourced the problem.

Most people need not therapy but community.

The reason people are desperate and depressed is not because they don’t have a suicide hotline’s number handy or an AA support group buddy; but because they are bereft of family and community.

This simplest of logical deductions we are no longer even able to arrive at without outsourcing thinking to the generators of empirical evidence, the expert class.

Here is that “doh!” factor, confirmed by The Economist in, “A pandemic of psychological pain: How to reduce the mental trauma of covid-19″:

Humans are resilient. Those who experience trauma mostly cope. When their homes are destroyed by earthquakes, they rebuild them and carry on. Even the mass bombing of cities in the second world war did not break civilian morale. Nonetheless, the world should take the collective mental damage of covid-19 seriously. Steps to reduce it cost little, and can benefit not only individuals but also society more broadly.

Research into previous disasters suggests that survivors’ long-term mental health depends more on “perceived support” than “received support”. In other words, donations of money or food matter less than the feeling that you can turn to your neighbours for help. Such help is typically offered spontaneously, but governments can also chip in. France, for example, sets up “medical and psychological emergency units” after terrorist attacks and other disasters. These try to minimise the long-term mental-health consequences of such events by offering immediate walk-in psychological support near the site of the disaster. Several cities in France have reactivated this “two-tent model”, one for medical care and the other for mental care, to help people cope with the toll of the virus.

Some people draw comfort from the fact that they are not alone—millions are facing the same tribulations at the same time. But the pandemic also presents unusual challenges. No one knows when it will end. Social distancing makes it harder to reconnect with others, a step in recovering from trauma. And the economic shock of covid-19 has undermined mental-health services everywhere, but especially in poor countries.

The most important measures will be local. A priority should be bringing people together by, say, expanding internet access. Mutual-aid networks (eg, WhatsApp groups to deliver groceries to the elderly), which tend to peter out once the initial disaster subsides, should instead be formalised and focused on the most vulnerable. Mental-health professionals should connect patients to such services, and train more lay folk as counsellors. In Zimbabwe, well before the pandemic, hundreds of grandmothers were taught how to provide talk therapy on village benches to depressed neighbours who could not afford to visit a distant clinic. Such innovations can work elsewhere, too.