Category Archives: Britain

‘God Bless Ilana,’ Writes British Libertarian Dr. Sean Gabb

Britain, Donald Trump, Elections, libertarianism, Paleolibertarianism

Dr. Sean Gabb is director of the Libertarian Alliance, based in the United Kingdom. He is a prodigious libertarian writer and scholar. Dr. Gabb writes the following on the popular Libertarian Alliance blog (to which I contribute):

Our own Ilana Mercer was one of Mr Trump’s earliest and most vocal and consistent supporters. When he announced he would run for election, and when she immediately went into drum majorette mode, I thought she had gone a little funny in the head. Here was a businessman and television personality, trying to break into the closed shop of American politics. I thought Ilana was funny in the head, and I thought Mr Trump a bit of a joke.

Then he showed his teeth, and I sat up. I began to read Ilana with more attention. I said nothing to her when she strained our charitable status to the limit. I watched astonished as the crowds began to gather, and as the most unlikely candidate anyone could have imagined began to tell truths I never thought to hear in front rank politics. Until close to the end, I doubted he could win. I thought Ilana would be terribly depressed by his losing, and that she would go away and sulk for a decade.

But he’s now President-elect Trump, and Ilana was right all along.

I think we should be grateful to Ilana for two reasons: …

“God Bless Ilana” is at the British Libertarian Alliance. Subscribe to the RSS feed.

Still in the Trump context, historian Dr. Clyde N. Wilson has blessed “The Trump Revolution: The Donald’s Creative Destruction Deconstructed” (June, 2016) with a review in Chronicles magazine, the flagship publication of principled paleoconservationism. “Sounding The Trump” appeared in the October 2016 issue of Chronicles (subscribe). A short excerpt:

In important ways, a revolutionary process has begun. So argues Ilana Mercer in the best extended analysis yet published of the Trump phenomenon: “Trump is getting an atrophied political system to oscillate” in “an oddly marvelous uprising.” For us revolutionaries there is still a long way to go, but we are entitled to a “modest hope” that “an utterly different political animal, Donald Trump, might actually do some good for the countrymen he genuinely seems to love.”

It is not Trump who is transforming American politics, the author asserts; “it’s the people of America doing the transforming.” Trump is the first politician in a long, long time who has regarded America as a country rather than a “proposition” and has actually spoken to and for “the people.” Far from being “divisive,” his plain speaking has enthusiastically united large numbers of Americans. …

… “White Lives Matter Less” has been, in Mercer’s words, “the creedal pillar” of our public life. Without ungraciousness to any, Trump has shown that it is OK for white Americans to declare that they have had enough of “the pigment burden” that has been piled on their backs. This paleo-libertarian author does not disguise her disgust at the fashionable statism, indistinguishable from the collectivist left and without a clue to what “free trade” really means, that passes for libertarianism today. …

… as Mercer points out with tough realism, … In this post-constitutional time, it may be that “the best liberty lovers can look to is action and counter-action, force and counterforce in the service of liberty.” A president hoping for reform will face 160,000 pages of federal laws and regulations and relentless sabotage by the Banksters, Bombers, Bureaucrats, and Busybodies who now govern us. He cannot be a moderate if he hopes to accomplish anything.

On “Mercer’s Menckenesque ability to coin memorable phrases describing the empowered fools of our time,” Professor Wilson’s asks: “Does any contemporary writer do it better?”

Finally, a reviewer with a sense of fun; someone with the good sense to have a hearty chuckle at this verbal swordplay:

Mercer on the media: “news nitworks,” the “War Street Journal,” “idiot’s lantern,” “unsharpened pencil,” “tele-tarts,” a “circle jerk of power brokers,” “one-trick donkeys,” “celebrated mediocrities,” “another banal bloviation,” the “cable commentariat as a cog in the corpulent D.C. fleshpot.”

Mercer on our rulers and would-be rulers: “parasites in waiting”; “nation-building at the point of the bayonet makes [Hillary] barking happy”; “Banana Republicans”; “dwarf-tossing” (William Kristol’s promotion of nonentities as Trump alternatives); the “quaint expectation that voters, not party operatives, would choose the nominee”; the “silent majority that dare not speak its name”; “what our crypto-leftist conservatives are ramming down our proverbial gullets are dogmas, not values”; the “master-servant relationship between Republicans and the Religious Right”; the “think tanks’ industry for the god of war”; “neoconservatives speaking like Tocqueville but acting like Robespierre”; “neoconservatives standing athwart every valid form of American conservatism yelling stop.”

What a review and what an honor! Subscribe to Chronicles here.

What I Predicted About No-Nothing Statistician Nate Silver, The Pundits & Pols

Britain, Donald Trump, Elections, Europe, Media, Nationhood

From my June 29 book, “The Trump Revolution: The Donald’s Creative Destruction Deconstructed”:

… whether they’re missing the Trump phenom or the casus belli for war in Iraq—America’s deeply stupid, self-anointed cognoscenti recognize truth only once card-carrying members arrive at it independently, grasp and broadcast it, sometimes years too late. Not so the marginalized writers of America. Not in 2012, but in 2002 did we pinpoint the wrongness of the Iraq War. And not in 2016, but on July 19, 2015—when this chronicle began—did some of us, not fortuitously, finger Trump as “a candidate to ‘kick the crap out of all the politicians’” and “send the system’s sycophants scattering” (August 14, 2015). His appeal, as this writer has contended since late in 2015, transcends left and right. Conversely, vaunted statistician Nate Silver ‘calculated, last November, that Trump’s support was ‘about the same share of people who think the Apollo moon landings were faked.’ (Professor Tyler Cowen of George Mason University properly downgraded wonder boy Silver’s intellectual prowess. His prose was a sprawl that ‘evinces a greater affiliation to rigor with data analysis than to rigor with philosophy of science or for that matter rigor with rhetoric,’ wrote the good teacher.)”

MORE in “The Trump Revolution: The Donald’s Creative Destruction Deconstructed”.


Big Fox Fraudster:


Running scared:

UPDATED: What’s Islam Been Up To Lately?

Britain, Constitution, IMMIGRATION, Islam, Race

Update 8/6: When Machetes Attack (Aka Muslims screaming the name of their god):


When Knives Attack (Aka when a Muslim Immigrant attacks):


Needed: A Muslim Lives Matter Movement:


Migrating To Hungary:


“Khizr Khan’s Mystery Constitution”:


The Angry & Pessimistic Khans:


Not-So Candid Khan:


Un-American Gold Star Designation:


Learn To Love Being Lectured By Islam:


Waving The Constitution As Argument:


Learn To Lay Down Your Life For Islam:


The Nose Bag

Americans No Longer Have The Money, But Brexiter Brits Still Have The Brains

Britain, English, EU, Europe, Free Markets, Ilana Mercer, Intelligence, Journalism, Left-Liberalism, Nationhood

The new book, “The Trump Revolution: The Donald’s Creative Destruction Deconstructed,” is available on Amazon. The new column, “Americans No Longer Have ‘the Money,’ But Brexiter Brits Still Have ‘the Brains,’” is excerpted below:

During the Bretton Woods Conference, in 1944, Lord Halifax is said to have “whispered to Lord Keynes: ‘It’s true: they have the money bags but we have all the brains.’” By “they,” Halifax meant the Americans.

His frustration with the American mind—often prosaic and anti-intellectual—during the critical Bretton-Woods negotiations seems as valid today. As odious as Britain’s elites are; boy, are they cleverer than ours. Take the impromptu interview, on June 28, which Richard Quest, CNN’s imported British broadcast journalist, conducted with Nigel Farage, leader of the UK Independence Party.

Farage had emerged exhilarated from the coven that is the European Parliament, where he had shared some home truths with the ponces leeching off Britain.

Other than to mouth formulaically about “small government, big military, balanced budgets and the penny plan”—America’s chattering class and ruling elites seem incapable of expressing the principles undergirding freedom. And members of this political Idiocracy dissolve into a puddle if their cue cards disappear.

Farage, however, spoke to some difficult ideas with ease, and without notes.

The act of secession, the quests for sovereignty, decentralization and regional autonomy from a second tier of tyrants—the first being the national, British government—involve comprehending complicated ideas.

About this, Milton Friedman forewarned in the introduction to F.A. Hayek’s “The Road to Serfdom.” Whereas “the argument for collectivism is simple if false; it is an immediate emotional argument.” “The argument for individualism” and freedom, on the other hand, “is subtle and sophisticated; it is an indirect rational argument.”

Put differently: If you can’t express the principles of liberty, can you properly pursue them? Will you not forgo them?

It’s difficult for dummies to understand liberty, let alone defend it, a problem the scintillating, cerebral Mr. Farage doesn’t have.

“You as a political project are in denial,” he told the grumbling laggards in the EU chamber. The EU had, “by stealth by deception, and without ever telling the truth to the British and European people, imposed political union upon them.”

Not to be trusted, EU advocate Segolene Royal, French environment minister and former socialist candidate for the French presidency, praised this coerced union, calling it a “family.” “The family is supposed to have a say in when a member leaves,” she griped to BBC’s tough talker, Stephen Sackur.

The sort of family Royal describes is known as La Familia, a crime family that knee caps you if you leave.

Heckling Eurocrats were reminded by Farage that when, in 2005, the people of the Netherlands and France said adieu to an enforced political union—the Eurocrats had “ignored them and brought in the Lisbon Treaty through the backdoor.” Indeed, the last refuge of a Brussels scoundrel is the bureaucracy. When voters scuttled the EU Constitution in that referenda; the rogues being upbraided by Farage dissolved one illegitimate political structure and constituted another.

“You’re in denial,” continued Farage, “about Mrs. Merkel’s invitation to any and all to cross the Mediterranean and enter the EU, all of which has led to massive divisions between and within countries.”

What the little people did, what the ordinary people did, what the people who’ve been oppressed have done is to reject the multinationals, reject the merchant banks, reject Big Politics, and demand their country back, their fishing waters back, their borders back. We want to be an independent self-governing nation. [If anything], we offer a beacon of hope. The UK will not be the last member state to leave the EU.

A series of similar watersheds would follow, predicted Farage.

Fleetingly, at least, Farage’s fluency with the ideas of freedom took effect. The blank faces flanking UKIP’s leader looked somewhat animated. Fewer jeered; some even clapped and cheered as Farage went on to submit that no stalling would be tolerated. The will of the British people would be heeded forthwith. Called for was “a grown-up and sensible attitude” toward executing popular—in this case, naturally licit—wishes.

Mr. Farage was not done, …

… Read the complete column, “Americans No Longer Have ‘the Money,’ But Brexiter Brits Still Have ‘the Brains,’” on the Unz Review. The book, “The Trump Revolution: The Donald’s Creative Destruction Deconstructed,” you’ll need to purchase.