Category Archives: Celebrity

CNN Self-Aggrandizing Mediocrity, Brooke Baldwin, Steps Down

Celebrity, Ethics, Etiquette, Feminism, Gender, Journalism, Left-Liberalism, Media, Propaganda

Brooke Baldwin, you will never be, as you boast here, “innovative, creative, or [an agent for] change.” Never.

To deploy the idiom of the Bell Curve distribution, Brooke seems to me to be the Mode, the most common value in a set, her opinions and range of ideas falling comfortably with the most frequently occurring among her tribe.

Baldwin is an ego in an anchor’s chair. She has shown herself over the years to be indistinguishable from the condescending, arrogant cretins with whom she has worked. Now she has an announcement so important that she tells all. After all, she is not merely a cog in the CNN org …

If you doubt what I say, here is the Barely-A-Blog Brooke Baldwin dossier of dastardly positions and poses, such as when the “humorless CNN anchor berated Border Patrol for joking with sainted, separated kids.”

Turning Point USA’s Bread-And-Circuses Conservatism

Celebrity, Communism, Conservatism, Intelligence, Kids, Political Economy, Political Philosophy, Republicans, Socialism

Faced with urban unrest, government that will never be limited again, institutionalized antiwhite hatred (it’s not identity politics, Candace Owens, it’s anti-white politics) and the attendant endemic violence, not to mention financial collapse—Turning Point USA has only a “bread and circuses” conservatism to offer conservative kids attending a Student Action Summit.

With respect to TPUSA vaporizing about socialism constantly, the kids should consider this warning  (from “Wake Up. Systemic Anti-Whiteness Is Deadly. Witness South Africa,” October 15, 2020):

“Dissecting and decrying communism is an ideological luxury, the province of relatively wealthy, stable, developed democracies.”—ILANA Mercer

When your society is overrun by barbarians, socialism will be the last thing you’ll be sitting down to bargain for with your captives.

American Justices Should Be Less Notorious, Even Anonymous

America, Celebrity, Federalism, Justice, Law, Pop-Culture, The Courts

About the stardom Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a quiet, reclusive and rather thoughtful jurist, achieved, the Economist writes:

AT THE TIME of her death, Ruth Bader Ginsburg featured on more than 3,000 pieces of memorabilia which were for sale on Amazon.com. Fans of “Notorious RBG” could buy earrings, mugs, babygrows, fitness manuals and Christmas decorations (“Merry Resistmas!”), all bearing her face.
something has gone wrong with America’s system of checks and balances. The United States is the only democracy in the world where judges enjoy such celebrity, or where their medical updates are a topic of national importance. This fascination is not healthy.

The Supreme Court is not elected. Yet its power is ultimately founded on the trust and consent of Americans who believe that its decisions are impartial and grounded in law, not party. The more brazenly parties attempt to capture it as the choicest political prize, the less legitimate it will be. Imagine that a court judgment determines who wins November’s election. …

There is a better way. America is the only democracy where judges on the highest court have unlimited terms. In Germany constitutional-court judges sit for 12 years. If America had 18-year non-renewable terms, each four-year presidency would yield two new justices. It would end the spectacle of judges trying to game the ideology of their successor by choosing when they retire. And it would help make the court a bit less central to American politics—and thus more central to American law. Justice Ginsburg was a great jurist. A fitting tribute to this notorious judge would be to make her the court’s last superstar. ?

The problem is that the entire federal system is broken, in tatters. It’s now down to brute-force tactics, to winning. Bader Ginburg knew it. “In her dissents she sometimes appealed to Congress to correct the law.” She didn’t necessarily think it was SCOTUS’ role.  (See: Obituary.)

At heart she was still what she had always been, a judicial minimalist. She was stunned by the lack of caution in the Roe v Wade ruling of 1973 that legalised abortion; though she certainly approved of the outcome, reform should have come through state legislatures, where it was slowly starting to appear. She was shocked too when the court, while upholding Obamacare, found it illegal under the commerce clause of the constitution; that had been Congress’s domain since the 1930s. In her dissents she sometimes appealed to Congress to correct the law and occasionally, to her delight, it did.

SEE: “How to make American judges less notorious: Supreme Court judges should be term-limited

UPDATED (9/23): Americans Importing Black Babies

Celebrity, Critique, Culture, Ethics, Family, Race, Relatives

Mitt Romney’s son did it. So did Madonna. Angelina Jolie pioneered the social art of color-coding her family, even disclosing her intention to acquire a designer, United Colors of Benetton family. About her quest for color-coordinated couture kids she said this to Anderson Cooper:

We don’t know which—which country. But we’re looking at different countries. And we’re—I’m just—it’s gonna be the balance of what would be the best for Mad[dox] and for Z. right now. It’s, you know, another boy, another girl, which country, which race would fit best with the kids.

Clearly, some of the most sanctimonious, white, virtue-preeners around us go abroad in search of black kids to adopt. It’s almost as though these people seek an amulet with which to elevate and immunize themselves against any fault-finding. Look at me: I’m perfect.

There is so much poverty in the US, in general. There is so much child poverty in the US, in particular. There is so much poverty among white American children. On the facts, adopting across racial lines often proves to be fraught for both adopted and adopting parties. A minefield of sorts.

Amy Coney Barrett, a much-touted candidate for the Supreme Court, has a child or two from Haiti. Is one ever permitted to question public figures who sidestep their country’s poor, and go in search of kids with more exotic identities? Can we even ask?

UPDATE (9/23): Our reader below instructs that we dare not pose questions about a cohort that is distinguished by its phoniness. No can’t do.

I doubt very much that Madonna is able to love anyone but herself. Check out the demeaning way in which she displays the poor kid. The black child looks like a gangster, not like a girl, tongue hanging out, gesturing, while Madonna decks herself up to look feminine. Unkind. Horrid.