Category Archives: Ilana Mercer

NEW ON YouTube: DAVID VANCE AND I DISCUSS ‘DEEP TECH’!

Business, Criminal Injustice, Free Speech, Ilana Mercer, Paleolibertarianism, Political Economy, Political Philosophy, Private Property, Regulation, Technology

DAVID VANCE and I DISCUSS ‘DEEP TECH’! It’s a wide-ranging discussion, but it’s also “deep,” we hope.

David, who had upwards of 200,000 Followers on Twitter, was removed from that forum by the ignoramuses in charge, and he periodically gets sent to the YouTube doghouse by another set of equally asinine knaves.

My own (highbrow) content has been limited on Facebook’s (lowbrow) slum-dog forums. I’m throttled on Twitter.

Why? What have a demure writer, a mild-mannered broadcaster and many others like us done to give the billionaires in charge the excuse to make it hard for us to make a living? We distill the meaning of it all.

David and his producer, Ged, have created such a welcoming and interesting environment for me—yeah, I like those hard-to-find English niceties known as “manners” and professionalism—that we’ve decided to make the chat a regular thing.

I appreciate your support in sharing the segment and providing feedback here.

‘American Foreign Policy Advances the Globalist Revolution’

America, Cultural Marxism, Foreign Policy, Ilana Mercer, South-Africa

Boyd D. Cathey at LewRockwell.com about my column at CNSNews.com, “Americans Should Recall How Foreign-Policy Alinskyites Destroyed South Africa“: 

“… One writer who is also a dear friend is Ilana Mercer. Ilana writes a regular column that is printed in various venues. A former citizen of South Africa, she has seen quite personally how the ravages of Marxist and Communist revolution can destroy a civilized country and its social structures. And she has recounted that experience—and warning to the West—in detail in her necessary volume, Into The Cannibal’s Pot: Lessons For America From Post-Apartheid South Africa. It’s a book that more Americans should know and pay heed to, for there are certain parallels with the insane post- or neo-Marxist ‘woke’ anti-racist and anti-white revolution now occurring almost unopposed here in the United States. Indeed, what is now happening here makes the revolution in and transformation of South Africa seem mild in comparison. 

In a recent column, Mercer offers a broad survey which examines the tragically obtuse and wrongheaded policies of the United States around the globe: for decades, whether under Democratic or Republican presidents—it seems to make little difference—American policy has been to impose on other countries by whatever method was convenient or available an egalitarian leftist-liberal ‘democratism,’ a uniform global model as part of a universal zeal to remake the world. Older traditions, inherited religious belief, valued customs, and forms of government and statecraft which do not hew the ‘democratic’ line and do not celebrate “equality” (as our government apparatchiks define it successively to suit their globalism) become pariah states. And soon, with the influence of US government-supported and financed NGOs (non-government organizations), ‘opposition’ groups pop up in those non-juring countries. With American funding and the enthusiastic participation of almost the entirety of the US media, including most so-called ‘conservative media’ (e.g. Fox News, National Review, The Wall Street Journal, etc.), new paper ‘heroes of democracy’ are created and showcased. …”

MORE: “American Foreign Policy Advances the Globalist Revolution.

UPDATE: Nothing escapes my loyal, and oh-so smart readers.

NEW ON YouTube: David Vance In Conversation With ilana mercer

Argument, Britain, Conservatism, Ilana Mercer, libertarianism, Paleolibertarianism, Political Philosophy, Race, Racism, The West

Interested interviewers: I am laconic, not loquacious.—ilana mercer

A YouTube CHAT With UK’s illustrious and debonair David Vance: The lads (David and his producer) treated me so very kindly. (As in welcoming and mannered, rather than like other requests constantly received from ego-bound interviewers, concerned with rambling with me about their own views, which, being laconic, not loquacious, I cannot do.) We laughed hard, sharing that Sir Humphrey Appleby sense of humor.

The topics: The Systemic Racism irrational rot, deconstructed in columns, and my latest on the wussification of the West, as manifested in the book-burning Seuss saga and the conservative response thereto.

Hint: We both argue process—the right of freemen to think, speak and write impolite thoughts. We refuse to debate the content of those thought, because that would be conceding the Left’s Argument, as conservatives habitually do.

I was delighted to be asked by David to come on more regularly.

 

 

South Africa Through Old World, South-African Eyes

America, Democracy, History, Ilana Mercer, Race, South-Africa

How much of an old-school South African is this writer?

Consider the image appended to this short, lyrical post. It is a rare picture of P.W. Botha, South African prime minister, later president, with his second wife, Barbara Botha (nee Robertson), also the person who sent me this image.

This dear lady contacted me after the publication, in 2011, of Into The Cannibal’s Pot: Lessons For America From Post-Apartheid South Africa. We corresponded. I felt we spoke the same language.

Yes, Americans rabbit on about the “Boers, Boers, Boers,” but in truth, it was the Boers, the Brits and the Bantu, in South Africa, locked in a struggle, as Into The Cannibal’s Pot honestly chronicles.

South Africa, it seems to me, is only ever refracted thorough uniquely, New World, American lenses. To me, most young South Africans sound as though they have no connection to the old South Africa in any real sense. And why would they? As detailed in Into The Cannibal’s Pot, the country’s history has been expunged or rewritten:

… landmarks in the country’s founding history are slowly being erased, as demonstrated by the ANC’s decision to give an African name to Potchefstroom, a town founded in 1838 by the Voortrekkers. Pretoria is now officially called Tshwane. Nelspruit, founded by the Nel Family (they were not Xhosa), and once the seat of the South African Republic’s government during the Boer War, has been renamed Mbombela. Polokwane was formerly Pietersburg. Durban’s Moore Road (after Sir John Moore, the hero of the Battle of Corunna, fought in 1809 during the Napoleonic Wars) is Che Guevara Road …. (p. 80)

It’s a strange thing to say, but, again, to me, young South Africans sound more American. They sound like they are more likely to know Candice Owens than to have heard of Gatsha Buthelezi.

I am a South African by birth. The sources  I used in Into The Cannibal’s Pot reflect my being an older South African, who had been steeped in the place prior to democracy; having known South Africa and the characters at play on the political stage well before democracy.

People like the brilliant commentator Dan Roodt, the famous musician and activist, Steve Hofmeyr, and patriot Cuan Elgin: These people know of what I speak. They understand the Old South Africa.

I don’t mean this unkindly, but honestly, Americans don’t have a feel for the place as it was—yet so many South Africans look to American writing about South Africa to set the tone of the narrative about the region.

And they seem to have no value for an older generation of their own sons and daughter who did know the old South Africa.