Category Archives: Canada

UPDATED III (3/31/021): The Developing Orwellian Covid Terminology. Will Vaccine Resisters Be WACOed?

Argument, Canada, COVID-19, Critique, Healthcare, Liberty, Nationalism, Politics, Propaganda

The “vaccine hesitancy” pejorative is an attempt to demonize clear thinking and reasoning.

Apropos the COVID-19 vaccine: Not one TV ego in an anchor’s chair has had the intelligence to ask about longitudinal studies.

The creation of a vaccine involves scientists and medical experts from around the world, and it usually requires 10 to 15 years of research before the vaccine is made available to the general public. [HERE]

There are none! The Covid vaccines are just too new; they were rushed to market. I’m all for well-tested vaccines. (Especially when liability is attached to the manufacturers. This is not the case with Covid-vaccine manufacturers.)

Then there is the Covid variants saga. It is clear to anyone with a critical mind thinks Covid vaccines will go the way of the flu vaccines: An annual affair if one chooses to make it so, because of the natural mutation these clever RNA strands undergo.

Personally, I’ve never taken the flu vaccine. My doctor concurs: The flu shots aren’t very effective.

UPDATE I (3/29/021): Logically, the COVID vaccine is likely to be an annual affair.

Who predicted that, above, on ? The same person who urged you to wear the N95 mask, on 3/5/020, when St. Fauci was cautioning you against protecting your life with a mask (for which that man should stand in the dock).

The planet could have a year or less before first-generation Covid-19 vaccines are ineffective and modified formulations are needed, according to a survey of epidemiologists, virologists and infectious disease specialists. …

Instead of listening to America’s crooked medical talking-head imbeciles, all clawing their way to becoming part of the Biden—or, before that Trump’s—task force—or consultants to the corporate media—here is an aggregated opinion:

The grim forecast of a year or less comes from two-thirds of respondents, according to the People’s Vaccine Alliance, a coalition of organisations including Amnesty International, Oxfam, and UNAIDS, who carried out the survey of 77 scientists from 28 countries. Nearly one-third of the respondents indicated that the time-frame was likely nine months or less.

…“New mutations arise every day. Sometimes they find a niche that makes them more fit than their predecessors. These lucky variants could transmit more efficiently and potentially evade immune responses to previous strains,” said Gregg Gonsalves, associate professor of epidemiology at Yale University, in a statement.

For the evolutionary advantage—mutation—of a clever little RNA coil the experts blame the “vaccine hesitancy” of the population at large. Or, global, systemic racism: Not enough sharing by the developed world.

We vaccinate every year for the flu because of mutations, don’t we? Why would the clever SARS-CoV-2 be less efficient?

MORE:New Covid vaccines needed globally within a year, say scientists.”

UPDATE II (3/31/021): Strokes.

Correlation is not causation, but a person I love dearly had a stroke a few weeks after the vaccine. The individual was NOT AT RISK FOR A STROKE. WTF!

Trace Alex Berenson’s Socratic questions about the correlation of all the new, messenger-RNA technology vaccinations to strokes:

https://mobile.twitter.com/AlexBerenson/status/1376911443367501828

UPDATE III: Will They WACO Vaccine Resisters?

As surmised in this space, the Covid vaccines last as long as the virus’s next mutation.

Israel’s Netanyahoo, however, has floated the freaky idea of a six-monthly vaccine schedule:

“The vaccines we have, no one knows how long they last…We need to prepare for the worst scenario. The worst scenario is that we have to vaccinate every half year.”

Do they plan to intern or force the stuff into the resister community’s veins? Upon arriving in Canada, the newly arrived must submit to being corralled into a government-designated “hotel.” There is an exorbitant shakedown fee, too. The policy was instituted by Justin Trudeau, who is both despicable as he is deeply stupid.

Could they WACO resisters? Will WACO now become a verb? Oh, I forget: the kids don’t learn history, ancient or recent. It might teach them something.

Interview: Ilana Mercer, Part 1: Roots, Writing, & Resistance

Canada, Conservatism, Critique, Ethics, Etiquette, Family, Ilana Mercer, Journalism, Paleoconservatism, Paleolibertarianism

Interview: Ilana Mercer, part 1: Roots, writing, & resistance, By Dissident Mama on Friday, September 25, 2020.

I gave an interview to an up-and-coming young star, Dissident Mama, aka Rebecca Dillingham. She writes:

“It’s been a long time in the making, but here it is: the first installment of my two-part interview with the always provocative and poignant Ilana Mercer. Part 2 should be published on Monday. Keep your eyes wide open for that – it promises to be explosive!”

The tagline at Ilana Mercer’s website is “Verbal swordplay for civilization.” Ain’t that the truth. The self-described paleolibertarian has been wielding words and fighting the good fight since well before I even thought about fleeing the clutches of feminism-atheism-socialism. She’s both provocative and poignant – a difficult thing to pull off anytime, much less in our postmodern dystopia.

I remember first stumbling upon Mercer at World Net Daily back in my neocon “daze” in the early 2000s. I recall being moved by not only her tenacity, but her cerebral style. Being such a prolific essayist, I then found her articles during my libertarian/ancap phase. And again, her writing spoke to me. Now, I’m what you’d call a paleoconservative/Southern traditionalist, and yet, there she is again: writing articles that say things we all want to say but don’t know how, or planting seeds for new thinking.

Now, I don’t always agree with Mercer. I’d say she speaks my language on most matters, but that’s really not what draws me to her work. When you read Mercer, you know that she’s coming to her conclusions through principled inquiry, deep research, a passion for justice, and an impatience with the insanity. In other words, she’s rational but on fire!

And Mercer can see through so many of the charades. Perhaps this is due to her years of experience or because, as Jack Kerwick says, “Ilana is in much greater supply of that ‘manly virtue’ than are most male writers today.”

As Southern stalwart Dr. Clyde Wilson explains of Mercer, “This is one libertarian who knows that the market is wonderful, but it is not everything.” Intellectual honesty like that is hard to come by these days, and that’s why Mercer’s writing is so damn good: it’s fearless and succinct. Bold and challenging. Accessible and engrossing.

Moreover, anyone who’s forever banned from Facebook, pegged as a hater by the SPLC, and given accolades by everyone from Peter Brimelow and Vox Day, to Tom Woods and Paul Gottfried, well, they’re pretty cool in my book. Plus, Mercer has become what I would call a mentor and a friend. So, for those of you who don’t already know her, please meet the never-to-be-duplicated Ilana Mercer. And folks who are already familiar with her and her independent streak, get ready to have your socks knocked off.

MORE… Ilana Mercer, part 1: Roots, writing, & resistance, By Dissident Mama on Friday, September 25, 2020.

 

 

YoutTube: THAT KISS

Canada, Feminism, Gender, Political Correctness, Pop-Culture, Sex, The Zeitgeist

In “THAT KISS,” I share impressions about “one of the most enchanting, culturally significant little video clips I’ve seen for a long time,” featuring two adorable young people in Toronto’s Trinity Bellwoods Park, and I praise CTV News anchor Nathan Downer for airing this COVID-unfriendly, “non-consensual kiss.”

HERE IS THE VIDEO DISCUSSED: https://youtu.be/rDCI_rY1WzM

BACKDROP STORY: https://www.thestar.com/life/2020/05/22/ctv-issues-apology-after-video-shows-non-consensual-kiss.html

CORRECTION. MY BAD: Instead of  “Nathan Downer apologized for intuitively ‘ruining,’ the video clip,” I should have said “running,” obviously.

What Canada’s Outbreak Scientists Knew About WuFlu By December 31 (And The US Was Too Callous and Incurious To Find Out)

Canada, China, COVID-19, Intelligence, Technology

It’s telling that, not the US, but a Canadian company, Blue Dot, was among the first to raise the alarm about WuFlu in late December. It uses an Artificial Intelligence algorithm, which pointed to the suspect wetmarket, then lit up as the infection spread therefrom. Anybody could have purchased this program.

The company, Blue Dot, had no clients in the [intellectually incurious?] U.S.

Come to think of it, the US’s formidable Surveillance State should have known about Blue Dot technology, but I guess the program doesn’t appear to harvest personal data, only anonymized data, thus holding no appeal to the opportunistic overlords referred to reverentially as “the U.S. intelligence community.”

Neither does the Blue Dot computer rely on official statements from state actors in tracking an outbreak. It seems to be a mighty analyst and information aggregator. Thus, by the dates mentioned, “Their algorithm was already churning through data, including medical bulletins, even livestock reports, to predict where the virus would go next.’

Canada should certainly have even fewer deaths from coronvirus given that one of its companies had some of this most sophisticated, foolproof methods to track a pandemic before it hits (Canada likely chose not to stop flights from China, even though it knew the score well before our covidiots):

 

When you’re fighting a pandemic, almost nothing matters more than speed. A little-known band of doctors and hi-tech wizards say they were able to find the vital speed needed to attack the coronavirus: the computing power of artificial intelligence. They call their new weapon “outbreak science.” It could change the way we fight another contagion. Already it has led to calls for an overhaul of how the federal government does things. But first, we’ll take you inside BlueDot, a small Canadian company with an algorithm that scours the world for outbreaks of infectious disease. It’s a digital early warning system, and it was among the first to raise alarms about this lethal outbreak.

It was New Year’s Eve when BlueDot’s computer spat out an alert: a Chinese business paper had just reported 27 cases of a mysterious flu-like disease in Wuhan, a city of 11 million. The signs were ominous. Seven people were already in hospitals.

Almost all the cases came from the city’s sprawling market, where live animals are packed in cages and slaughtered on-site. Medical detectives are now investigating if this is where the epidemic began, when the virus made the leap from animals to us.

… Chinese officials were secretive about what was happening. But BlueDot’s computer doesn’t rely on official statements. Their algorithm was already churning through data, including medical bulletins, even livestock reports, to predict where the virus would go next.

It was also scanning the ticket data from 4,000 airports.

BlueDot wasn’t just tracking flights, but calculating the cities at greatest risk. On December 31, there were more than 800,000 travellers leaving Wuhan, some likely carrying the disease.

In a matter of a just seconds, the Blue Dot computer can “analyze and visualize all this information across the globe in just a few seconds.”

“The virus wasn’t just spreading to east Asia. Thousands of travelers were heading to the United States too. … Most of the travel came into California and San Francisco and Los Angeles. Uh, also, into New York City. And we analyzed that way back on December 31. Our surveillance system that picked up the outbreak of Wuhan automatically talks to the system that is looking at how travelers might go to various airports around Wuhan.”

The virus spread across Asia with a vengeance. BlueDot has licensed access to the anonymized location data from millions of cellphones. And with that data it identified 12 of the 20 cities that would suffer first.

Dr. Kamran Khan: What we’re looking at here are mobile devices that were in Wuhan in the previous 14 days and where are they now across East Asia. Places like Tokyo have a lot of devices, Seoul in South Korea–

Bill Whitaker: So you’re following those devices from Wuhan to these other cities?

Dr. Kamran Khan: That’s correct. I do wanna point out these are also anonymized data. But they allow us to understand population movements. That is how we can understand how this virus will spread.

To build their algorithm, Dr. Khan told us he deliberately hired an eclectic mix: engineers, ecologists, geographers, veterinarians all under one roof. They spent a year teaching the computer to detect 150 deadly pathogens.

Dr. Kamran Khan: We can ultimately train a machine to be reading through all the text and picking out components that this is talking about an outbreak of anthrax and this is talking about the heavy metal band Anthrax. And as you do this thousands and thousands and thousands of times, the machine starts to get smarter and smarter.

Bill Whitaker: And how many different languages does the computer understand?

Dr. Kamran Khan: So it’s reading this currently in 65 languages, and processing this information every 15 minutes, 24 hours a day. So it’s a lotta data to go through.

Within two hours of detecting the outbreak on December 31, BlueDot had sent a warning of the potential threat to its clients: public health officials in 12 countries, airlines and frontline hospitals, like Humber River in Toronto.

The US was too dumb and callous to buy Blue Dot’s AI program.

MORE: “The computer algorithm that was among the first to detect the coronavirus outbreak.”