Category Archives: Economy

From The Deplorables’ Perspective, Hillary Got Slaughtered @ First Presidential Debate

Business, Crime, Donald Trump, Economy, Foreign Policy, Gender, Hillary Clinton, Lebanon, Media


Not America First:

Clinton’s Ctrl-Alt-Delete Rant:

Make America Great Again:

And Now For Something Completely Different: Moron Media:

Pivoting from Putin:

Aliens:

Moocher Vs. Producer:

Crook:

Where Are The Trump Ads About America’s Dire Economic Indices?

Business, Donald Trump, Economy, Hillary Clinton, Labor

The participation rate in the economy is the lowest since the 1970s. Not since World War II have so many able-bodied American men of working age been out of the work force. Wages have declined commensurate with declining productivity, brought about by a lack of investment. In other words, if business operations are not well-capitalized and equipped with the latest technology; productivity will naturally decline.
New businesses are struggling to get off the ground.

These facts, discussed on The Journal Editorial Report this weekend, should be the stuff of non-stop Donald Trump ads, aired across the country.

Where are these Trump ads, pointing out that Hillary Clinton is clueless about economics. All Clinton grasps is government, the language of force.

The Dreck On Display At The DNC: A Roundup

Barack Obama, Communism, Democrats, Economy, Hillary Clinton, Left-Liberalism, Media, Race

From this Golden Oldie About Village Idiots (2002):

The “Hildebeest” is a … believer … in the power of legislation to renew communities. In fact, the philosophy popularized by Hillary Clinton is one that advocates undermining and forcibly stripping families and communities of their powers to keep their members in check, and replacing them with legislation that often transfers responsibility for children to the State.
When last did the actions of a legislator serve to renew a genuine community? Public housing slums? How about rent control? In many great cities, rent control has meant that there are more boarded up buildings than there are homeless, because landlords are not permitted to recover the costs of upkeep. Designed to preserve a way of life, enforced inter-provincial wealth equalization programs in Canada have resulted in chronically dependent and depressed regions. And we know how, with welfare policies, the state has helped destroy black families: young black women choose to marry the state rather than wed the fathers of their children. Last year, the prohibition on drug possession “recharged” the lives of roughly 1.5 million Americans, arrested for marijuana possession. Clearly, It Takes A Village Idiot to think of government policy as a means to a Renaissance.

That’s our Hillary.

Post Convention, Creeps Still Giddy:


Hillary’s Economy, Literally:


Dressing Up Economic Devastation:


The Right To Rob:


If Only She Spoke Like An Egyptian, Not a Commie:


Ah Yes, The Book, It Takes A Village Idiot:


FDR:


Eff The Kids:


C’mon: Bill Clinton Was Looking Kinda Good:


The Vagina-centric Music Goes With The Giant-Welfare Program:


Chelsea Did Not Chill:


The Tarts & Tards of Hollywood:


The Biggest Disappointment A The DNC:


The Women Folk:


The Turkey Barack Obama Pardons His White Grandparents:


The LGBTQ VP:


Hillary’s Village, Or is it a Penal Colony?


Wiki-Wonder:


Donald On Dem Emails:


Herstory Is Made:

On Trump Tribalism And Clinton’s Sinophobia

Africa, Capitalism, China, Democrats, Donald Trump, Economy, History, The West

“On Trump Tribalism And Clinton’s Sinophobia” is this week’s column, on The Unz Review, America’s smartest webzine. An excerpt:

Hillary Clinton, the Democratic Party’s presumptive presidential nominee for 2016, has something in common with Donald Trump: Sinophobia.

During a 2011 visit to Zambia, she warned about “a new colonialism in Africa.” This time, the Chinese were to blame. As Clinton sees it, the Chinese are extracting wealth from the continent by buying its raw materials. “We saw that during colonial times it [was] easy to come in, take out natural resources, pay off leaders and leave,” she griped.

Clinton was adamant. She did not want to see a European-style colonial redux in Africa.

Certainly Chinese state capitalism is not free-market capitalism. But is Chinese mercantilism not preferable to American militarism, an example of which is Libya, a north-African recipient of madam secretary’s largess? Not according to Mrs. Clinton.

As Clinton sees it (as do, no doubt, the Paul-Ryan Republicans and the Bernie Sanders socialists), the “old colonialism” saw underdeveloped nations “bilked by rich capitalist countries,” a phrase used by Lawrence E. Harrison and Samuel P. Huntington in Culture Matters: How Values Shape Human Progress.

According to these highly politicized, socialist, zero-sum formulations regarding colonialism, class warfare and “income inequality,” one person’s plenty is another’s poverty. The corresponding antidote invariably involves taking from one and giving to the other—from rich to poor; from North to South.

The notion, however, of a preexisting income pie from which the greedy appropriate an unfair share is itself pie-in-the-sky. Wealth, earned or “unearned,” as egalitarians term inheritance, doesn’t exist outside the individuals who create it; it is a return for desirable services, skills and resources they render to others. Labor productivity is the main determinant of wages—and wealth. People in the West produce or purchase what they consume—and much more; they don’t remove, or steal it from Third Worlders. Wrote the greatest development economist, Lord Peter Bauer, in Equality, the Third World, and Economic Delusion: “Incomes, including those of the relatively prosperous or the owners of property, are not taken from other people. Normally they are produced by their recipient and the resources they own.”

Not unlike Obama’s Republican predecessor, George W. Bush, who “dramatically increased U.S. foreign aid” (as reported approvingly in Foreign Affairs magazine); Mrs. Clinton also committed more funds to the Agency for International Development during her tenure as secretary of state.

When it comes to Africa, it’s worth noting, however, that four or five decades since decolonization; colonialism, dependency and racism no longer cut it as explanations for Africa’s persistent and pervasive underdevelopment. “Pseudo-scholars such as [the late] Edward Said and legions of liberal intellectuals have made careers out of blaming the West for problems that were endemic to many societies both before and after their experiences as European colonies,” noted Australian historian Keith Windschuttle, in a 2002 issue of American Outlook.

The truth is that colonization constituted the least tumultuous period in African history. This is fact; its enunciation is not to condone colonialism or similar, undeniably coercive, forays, only to venture, as did George Eliot in Daniel Deronda, that “to object to colonization absolutely is to object to history itself. To ask whether colonization in itself is good or bad is the same as asking whether history is a good or bad thing.” …

READ THE REST. “On Trump Tribalism And Clinton’s Sinophobia” is this week’s column, on The Unz Review.