Category Archives: Race

Wendy McElroy On The Invasion Of The Libertarian Body Snatchers

Left-Liberalism, libertarianism, Political Philosophy, Race, Racism

Libertarian theorist Wendy McElroy worries that she might have to leave the movement she practically founded, because, to use a biblical quote, “there arose a new king over Egypt, who knew not Joseph.” A new generation of self-styled libertarians that doesn’t know the meaning of libertarianism has arisen, according to which Wendy, and certainly myself, are deemed “brutalists.”

I wrote “Fee-Fi-Fo-Fem, I Smell The Blood Of A Racist” about one of their luminaries, before I understood the extent of the revisionism in which the “humanitarians” were engaged.

So numerous are the libertarians who condemn me that I have long since stopped giving a damn. Most are like the proverbial (or metaphysical) tree falling in the woods. We know they say stuff, but nobody wants to stick around to hear them make the tedious sounds they make.

Over to Wendy, who is heartbroken over “the attempt to change the ground rules of libertarianism through introducing left-leaning attitudes and concepts”:

… the absurd and manufactured debates [is] about “”thin” and “thick” libertarianism – the “humanitarians” versus the “brutalists.” It is an attempt to introduce political correctness into libertarianism so that it is not enough to advocate nonviolence; you have to advocate it for the right reason, as defined by those who provide themselves as moral filters. They call me a brutalist. This means I will never violate your rights; your children, your property are safe in my presence because I respect your right to live in peace. But I don’t protect your children for the right reasons. For this, I am to be excoriated. This is the second approach to a new definition of libertarianism: People wish to analyze society not according to whether it is voluntary but in order to ferret out signs of power and privilege which they self-righteously condemn. Consider open source software. It has been castigated as a realm of privilege because it predominantly consists of white men. Open source software is source code that is thrown into the public realm so that anyone can modify and enhance it. It is a pure expression of free speech; the product is available to everyone for free; there are no entry barriers or requirements other than caring enough to learn code. Learning code is also available and free to all.

I think it was the condemnation of open source software that made me crack. Out of the goodness of his heart, my husband has devoted substantial time to what amounts to an intellectual charity. He pursues it for the same reason he repairs and gives computers for free to underprivileged children; he believes in the power of technology to lift people out of poverty. (BTW, I strongly suggest no one criticize my husband to my face on this point; I am likely to render the most Irish of all responses.)

Open source software is condemned for no other reason than it involves few women or minorities. This reflects nothing more than the choice of those women and minorities. It costs nothing to learn coding. Tutorials are available for free to all and everywhere. Correction: It does cost time and effort. The individual has to exert him or herself. I’m not willing to make the investment but neither do I blame the first white guy I see for my own inertia. If there is something in the culture of women and of specific minorities that prevents them from rising, then blame the culture. Don’t blame a white man like my husband who is falling over himself to provide a free service. (Correction: my husband is Hispanic … but that won’t give him a free pass. I mean, after all … the genitalia. And the grand critics of society don’t really care for accuracy.)

Last night, I contemplated my exit from a movement that considers me to be a “brutalist” after years of unpaid work promoting nonviolence. I found myself engaging in an emotional release that I’ve used for many years. I wrote a letter to my father. My dad died when I was ten years old. I loved him. …

Read “A Letter to My Father” By Wendy McElroy


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To Make Cops Love Communities They Police, Communities Ought To Be Lovely.

Crime, Criminal Injustice, Left-Liberalism, Media, Race, Racism

“To make us love our country, our country ought to be lovely.”—Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France

A variation on Burke’s theme is what I get from the words of former Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson: To make cops love the communities they police, the communities they police ought to be lovely. And indeed, Wilson seems to have found aspects of the rough community he policed lovely. But that’s not enough for his inquisitors.

CNN transcripts:

JOHN BERMAN: New this morning, former Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson breaks his silence in a revealing new interview. The 29-year- old who shot and killed unarmed teenager, Michael Brown, tells “The New Yorker” he wanted to get back on the streets of Ferguson but was told he would be a liability. He says he can’t get another police job anywhere despite being cleared of any wrongdoing in Brown’s death.

KATE BOLDUAN: He also tells “The New Yorker” that he ended up working in Ferguson because policing black neighborhoods would be a good way to advance his career. He says this as well, “If you go there and do three to five years, get your experience, you can kind of write your own ticket.” And Wilson says he enjoyed his time on the force. He also is saying this, “I didn’t want to work in a white area. I like the black community. I had fun there. There’s people who will just crack you up.”

CNN’s Boris Sanchez is joining us, and Boris is taking a look at much more of this.

It’s a long and revealing interview.

BORIS SANCHEZ, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Certainly. He says quite a bit in there. One of the things you find out is he says he doesn’t think about Michael Brown. He hasn’t even read the Department of Justice report about the systemic racism in Ferguson. It’s really interesting because he kind of — the piece is meant to humanize him but, in a lot of ways, some of what he says brings up questions about his perspectives and his relations with the African-American community. At one point, he asks a fellow officer who helped train him for help in relating to some of the people in the community because he said he felt culture shock.

We’ll take a look at what he said. He asked Mike McCarthy, “Mike, I don’t know what I’m doing. This is a culture shock. Would you help me because you obviously have that connection, and you can relate to them? You may be white, but they respect you, so why can they respect you and not me?”

[11:15:26] Another thing Wilson says, as you mentioned, Kate, that he enjoyed policing in the African-American community because people there cracked him up. So he tries to paint this picture that he’s not a racist. At the same time, he goes on to say other things that many, including Michael Brown’s family, say kind of show that he has some prejudice. We’ll go to the other full screen now. He’s describing a blind mom in Ferguson apparently whose kids were running amok. He says they were causing trouble in the neighborhood. He said, “They ran all over the mom. They didn’t respect her, so why would they respect me?” He then goes on to say, “They’re so wrapped up in a different culture than — what I’m trying to say is the right culture, the better one to pick from.”

Now, the reporter wanted to find out if this was coded language, if this was somehow referring to race in kind of a subtle way. So the reporter pressed him. He said that Wilson struggled with an answer, going on to say, “Pre-gang culture where you’re just running in the streets, not worried about working in the morning, just worried about your immediate gratification.” And then he goes on to say, “It is the same younger culture that’s everywhere in the inner cities.”

Obviously, these quotes, the article, meant to humanize him, kind of bringing up more questions about his perspectives.

[SNIP]

The presstitute are still gunning for Darren Wilson.


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Hillary’s Racial Harangue

Democrats, Elections, Hillary Clinton, Race, Racism

If you want to be harangued non-stop—libeled a privileged racist, responsible for “structural racism,” if you happen to have been born white—vote for the Harridan Hillary. Haven’t you had enough of this offal? Here she is stomping around at the National Urban League’s conference in Fort Lauderdale:

“I don’t think you can credibly say that everyone has a right to rise and then say you’re for phasing out Medicare, or repealing Obamacare,” Clinton charged. “People can’t rise if they can’t afford health care. They can’t rise if the minimum wage is too low to live on. They can’t rise if their governor makes it harder for them to get a college education. And you can’t seriously talk about the right to rise and support laws that deny the right to vote.”

MORE yacking and nagging.


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Black Supremacy; White Slavery

Conservatism, Left-Liberalism, Race, Racism

“He’s a college dropout still trying to catch up on his reading.” … He “can only talk about racism because it’s the one subject for which he can claim immunity from the facts, not based on the truth, but based on an assumed moral authority of victimhood.” … He gets “paid to blog about his thoughts on Spider-Man for The Atlantic.” “His only struggle is deciding which frustration with a taxi, waiter or butler to turn into a column about racism this week.” “He was a visiting professor at MIT despite not having a degree in anything. He’s a success story whose topic is his own oppression.” His name is Ta-Nehisi Coates [yes, he’s an American, if a pretentious one]. And Daniel Greenfield describes his ilk to a T—except for the thing where conservatives, presumably to appear righteous, claim that such black privilege and supremacy make blacks “slaves on the liberal plantation.”

Nonsense! Come to think of it, the supremacy of the one race enslaves the other; it makes whites slaves.

“Rachel Dolezal: A Racially Abused Girl—Really” gets it right:

In America, black is beautiful. To be black is to be more righteous, nobler; carry the heaviest historic baggage—heavier than the Holocaust—and be encouraged to perpetually and publicly pick at those suppurating sores.

To be black is to have an unwritten, implicit social contract with wider, whiter society.

To be black it to be born with an IOY; it is to be owed apologies, obsequiousness, education, and auto-exculpation for any wrongdoing.


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Politically, White Lives Don’t Matter

Democrats, Politics, Race, Racism

White lives are unworthy of being compared in their sanctity to black lives. That’s the political position to adopt if one is a good Democrat politician, unwilling to alienate his liberal base. Martin O’Malley, Democrat for president, furnished an example of just how sickening the politcal mindset is—and why Donald Trump, who is unfreighted by such a mindset, appeals.

Activists at the Netroots Nation conference, in Pheonix, chanted at O’Malley, “Black lives matter, black lives matter.” O’Malley responded appropriately: “Black lives matter. White lives matter. All lives matter.” He repeated this catchy phrase, the reaction to which prompted an O’Malley apology:

The demonstrators, who were mostly black, responded by booing him and shouting him down.

Later that day, O’Malley apologized for using the phrase in that context if it was perceived that he was minimizing the importance of blacks killed by police.
Meet the progressives who want Hillary to 'feel the Bern'

“I meant no disrespect,” O’Malley said in an interview on This Week in Blackness, a digital show. “That was a mistake on my part and I meant no disrespect. I did not mean to be insensitive in any way or communicate that I did not understand the tremendous passion, commitment and feeling and depth of feeling that all of us should be attaching to this issue.”


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Rachel Dolezal: A Racially Abused Girl—Really

Left-Liberalism, Pseudoscience, Psychiatry, Race, Racism, The Zeitgeist

“Rachel Dolezal: A Racially Abused Girl—Really” is the current column. An excerpt:

… Poor Rachel [Dolezal] painted her face orange, gave herself a Sideshow Bob hairdo, and adopted the ideology of the eternally oppressed. Big deal. Most of America’s authentic poseurs are phonies who’ve never been oppressed.

Unlike most blacks, Dolezal—by the admission of the president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People’s Washington-State chapter—had done “quality work” to “elevate the issues of civil rights.”

“I just want to feel beautiful, and this is how I feel beautiful,” the woman said rather plaintively. Yes, Dolezal is the white face of parental and societal displacement. Why am I the only one to find her pitiful, even deserving of pity?

In America, black is beautiful.

To be black is to be more righteous, nobler; carry the heaviest historic baggage—heavier than the Holocaust—and be encouraged to perpetually and publicly pick at those suppurating sores.

To be black is to have an unwritten, implicit social contract with wider, whiter society.

To be black it to be born with an IOY (I Owe You); it is to be owed apologies, obsequiousness, education, and auto-exculpation for any wrongdoing.

Why can’t Rachel have some of that?

Was not Ms. Dolezal displaced for real in her parents’ affections? Rachel’s story should begin with parents Larry and Ruthanne Dolezal, who adopted four children, “three of whom were African-American while the other was from Haiti.”

Does this fashionable adoption not send a message to a vulnerable girl that she and her biological brother are too pale for their pious parents? …

Read the rest. “Rachel Dolezal: A Racially Abused Girl—Really” is now on The Unz Review, America’s smartest webzine.


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