Category Archives: Labor

NYC EMT & Fire Department Union Boss Presents Cogent, Comprehensive, Factual, Rational Argument Against Vaccines For Members

Argument, COVID-19, Critique, Ethics, Healthcare, Intelligence, Judaism & Jews, Labor, Race, Reason

I believe uber-progressive anchor Alex Witt, of MSNBC, likely went easy on Oren Barzilay because she must have believed the president of Emergency Medical Services Local 2507 of District Council 37 (President of Uniform EMTs, Paramedics & Inspectors – New York City Fire Department) to be a working-class man of an acceptably exotic ethnicity.

To me of course, the name screamed Israeli. As did the clear, comprehensive argument style, and cogent replies to everyone of the woman’s arguments for vaccine mandates.

Barzilay argued against mandates for his members. These are arguments that not one of the dimwits usually entertained on the idiot’s lantern (the TV) has proven able to rattle off.

In arguing against the mandates, Barzilay told Witt:

        1. No conclusive evidence exists to show the vaccines are not harmful. On the contrary, the CDC website reports over 12,000 deaths from these vaccines and thousands injured, or having sustained some medical issues.
        2. The vaccines are not FDA approved and clinical trials have been limited and of short duration; no longitudinal data.
        3. In reply to Witt’s idiot question—which nobody in American media seems capable of refuting, and it is, “Have you and family not received the mumps, measles, polio vaccinations, and once the vaccines move from Emergency Authorization to FDA approved status, will you instruct your guys to take it?”—Barzilay did not miss a beat. He returned to Witt’s first point, emphasizing that older vaccines (I’ve recently gotten two Shingles shots) have over a decade of data behind them. The COVID vaccines went to market and into arms after 6 months of production, and even less time devoted to data collection and analysis.
        4. He is not telling his people not to get vaccinated; all Barzilay is insisting on is choice for his members, as to what they place in their bodies until the data are in.
        5. He wants to know (asking in a cynical, rhetorical manner) if the City will cover the expenses of those who have an adverse reaction. That’s unknown, argued Barzilay. I would argue one better: When admitted into hospital following vaccination, with a plethora of symptoms, you are more often than not subjected to batteries of tests that always appear aimed at ruling-out correlation with vaccination, instead of treating what could be dangerous symptoms.
          In the zeal to avoid implicating the vaccine in a reaction—individuals who suffer a reaction in proximity to vaccination might not even receive antidotes as soon as they need them. The aim of untrustworthy medical personnel seems to be to exonerate the vaccinators rather than assume a reaction and prevent a patient from dying.
          Essentially, medical personal have lost our trust that indeed they can spring into action, in the event we suffer adverse reactions to their ill-researched vaccines.
        6. Oren disputes that all his members are, as Witt assumed, grateful for the vaccines, since some have died following vaccination. He cannot definitively prove causation, but they died shortly thereafter. Two of Oren’s Local members died within 4 days of receiving the vaccine.

       

    1. RELATED READING: “Could Vaccine Resisters Be WACO’d?”

By The Numbers: The Biggest Losers From Covid-19

COVID-19, Economy, Healthcare, Labor, Populism

The Economist on “The biggest losers from covid-19,” by the numbers:

… death rate from covid-19 in the neighbourhood with the most essential workers was more than twice as high as in the one with the fewest. A study in California found that people of working age saw a 22% increase in mortality from March to October 2020. But bakers saw mortality rise by 50%, and line cooks by 60%. One class of people stayed home in their pyjamas; others went into workplaces that probably killed them.

“DURING THE pandemic one part of the workforce did not get to wear pyjamas during the day or join in marathon sessions of ‘Tiger King’. The people known as ‘key’, ‘frontline’ or ‘essential’ workers had to be in public spaces and often in close proximity with their colleagues. Many died. …”

“…Describing a worker as ‘key’ is an arbitrary exercise (the label covers most journalists, for example). It usually includes occupations necessary to meet everyone’s basic needs—food, heating and transport, not to mention health care. Most such jobs cannot be done from home….”

“…The pandemic has reminded key workers that without them society would grind to a halt. …”

“…A study in Toronto found that the death rate from covid-19 in the neighbourhood with the most essential workers was more than twice as high as in the one with the fewest. A study in California found that people of working age saw a 22% increase in mortality from March to October 2020. But bakers saw mortality rise by 50%, and line cooks by 60%. One class of people stayed home in their pyjamas; others went into workplaces that probably killed them.”

MORE…

*Image courtesy The Economist

Manufacturing Was Outsourced And The Working-Class Decimated, All For Cheap Goods And … Corona

Drug War, Economy, Labor, libertarianism, Outsourcing, Populism, Race, Welfare

Denial of white decline is to be found on the Left and Right–and certainly in the reporting of Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn.

Likely following in the popular footsteps of the annoying J.D. Vance of Hillbilly Elegy fame—Kristof returns to his hometown, Yamhill, Ore., to find, I wager, exactly what he expected to find, or else he’d never have embarked on this “journey” (he follows the news and the money):

Dying white people (hush).

the kids who were on my old school bus, Bus No. 6,” recounts Kristof … “About a quarter of the kids on the No. 6 Bus have died from drugs, alcohol and suicide

Come on, Nicholas, say it: Whites. (“American White Male Misery Is Real.”)

He also won’t own up to the part his ideological ilk played in the demise of the American working class.

The exchange the likes of Kristof have plumped for: Outsourcing America’s manufacturing base, thus consigning the working class to social oblivion, all in exchange for the wonders of cheap shit and … Corona Virus.

I recall how I was mocked in 2003 for decrying outsourcing, and promoting localism while libertarian, namely daring to question (not sanction) the sacred allocation of resources by business.

MORE: “Pulitzer Prize winners Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn shine a light on sweeping economic and social struggles across the United States in an important new book.”

COVID-19 Has Left Some Corporations With Lots Of … CASH

Business, COVID-19, Economy, Labor

Short term mañana thinking is endemic in business, too.

Were companies prepared for these “black swans,” these “highly improbable events” like corona virus? It turns out, as The Economist observes, that,

It might be possible, in principle, to self-insure against a disastrous drop in overall demand by sacrificing margins in order to build up buffers and to keep open strategic options the company will probably never willingly choose to use. But good luck convincing investors of that approach. Strategies which pay off handsomely in the event of even the worst case are terribly expensive.

Given the wealth transfer initiated from small to big business, due to the structure of the state’s stimulus, it is no surprise to learn that gargantuan business has endured quite well:

… many companies are already sitting on stacks of cash. Few boast sofas as plumply padded as Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Alphabet and Facebook, which have $270bn in net cash between them, enough to finance many countries’ covid-related fiscal stimulus. But the total cash holdings of the world’s 2,000 biggest listed non-financial corporations increased from $6.6trn in 2010 to $14.2trn today.

UPDATED (8/5/020): “The pandemic led to ‘one of the greatest wealth transfers in history’: The stock market is rising as big business rebounds from state-ordered stoppage of nonessential activity, while small businesses drop like flies.”