Category Archives: South-Africa

Larry Elder Shares Mercer Article On Intra-Racial Reparations

Celebrity, Conservatism, Ilana Mercer, Justice, Race, South-Africa

Larry Elder, a great American, has shared with his many followers my Unz Review column, “How About Intra-Racial Reparations in South Africa?”

The excerpt Mr. Elder chose from “How About Intra-Racial Reparations in South Africa?” is:

“…white South Africans are told to accept their obligation to give up ancestral lands they are alleged to have stolen. Should not the relatives of cannibals who gobbled up their black brethren be held to the same standards?”—ilana mercer

This is quite nice, too.

But “she” is not a public person. Glad to assist the queen bee, aka President Ann Coulter, behind the scenes, as she rescues the country.

NEW COLUMN: How About Intra-Racial Reparations In South Africa?

Africa, History, Race, Racism, South-Africa

NEW COLUMN IS “How About Intra-Racial Reparations In South Africa?” It’s on WND.COM and the Unz Review.

An excerpt:

Donald R. Morris’s epic tome, The Washing of the Spears: The Rise and Fall of the Zulu Nation, is the all-time PIG (Politically Incorrect Guide) to Zulu history.

In it, Morris notes correctly that the Bantu, like the Boers, were not indigenous to South Africa. They “dribbled south” from some “reservoir in the limitless north,” and, like the European settlers, used their military might to displace Hottentots, Bushmen (his archaic terminology), and one another through internecine warfare.

Indeed, there was bitter blood on Bantu lands well before the white settlers arrived in South Africa.

Westerners have committed the little San people of Southern Africa, the “Bushmen,” to folkloric memory for their unequalled tracking skills and for the delicate drawings with which they dotted the “rock outcroppings.”

The San were hunters, but they were also among the hunted. Mercilessly so. Alongside the Boers, Hottentots and blacks “hunted down Bushmen for sport well into the 19th Century.”

In “the book to end all books on the tragic confrontation between the assegai and the Gatling gun,” Morris places Cape Town’s founder and Dutch East India Company official J. A. Van Riebeeck, on landing at the Cape in 1652, 500 miles to the south and 1,000 miles to the west of the nearest Bantu. Joined by other Protestants from Europe, Dutch farmers, as we know, homesteaded the Cape Colony.

No doubt, the question of land ownership deeply concerned the 19th century trek Boers, as they prepared to decamp from the British-ruled Cape Colony and venture north. Accordingly, they sent out exploration parties tasked with negotiating the purchase of land from the black chieftains, who very often acted magnanimously, allowing Europeans to settle certain areas. Against trek Boers, it must be said that they were as rough as the natives and negotiated with as much finesse.

Still, the narrative about the pastoral, indigenous, semi-nomadic natives, dispossessed in the 17th century of their lands by another such people, only of a different color—this is as simplistic as it is sentimental.

When Boer and Bantu finally clashed on South Africa’s Great Fish River it was a clash of civilizations. “The Bantu viewed the land as entailed property that belonged to the clan. A chieftain might dispose of the right to live on the land, but he could not dispose of the land itself.” The European mind in general could not grasp the concept of collective ownership and “regarded a land transaction as a permanent exchange of real property.”

As Morris observes in his matter-of-fact way, “The Bantu view insured European encroachment and the European view insured future strife.”

South Africa has since reverted to “The Bantu view.” It is thus perhaps inevitable that 21st-century land claims or “restitution” in South Africa are not dominated by individual freehold owners reclaiming expropriated land, based on title deeds kept on record.

Rather, a group of blacks scheming on a particular property will band together as a “tribe,” and pool the taxpayer grants, which its members have received gratis, for the purpose of purchasing occupied land.

No sooner does this newly constituted “tribe” (or band of bandits, really) launch a claim with the South African Department of Rural Development and Land Reform, than related squatters—sometimes in the thousands—move to colonize the land. They defile its grounds and groundwater by using these as one vast latrine, and terrorize, even kill, its occupants and their animals in the hope of “nudging” them off the land.

The latest victim of this guerrilla warfare is a wine farmer, Stefan Smit of blessed memory, gunned down on his Stellenbosch estate, in the Western Cape. …

… READ THE REST.  NEW COLUMN, “How About Intra-Racial Reparations In South Africa?“, is now on WND.COM and the Unz Review.

UPDATED (5/27/019): ‘Apartheid Government’ Had Quite A Good Educational Outcome, Historians Discover. READ WHY.

Crime, Education, English, Globalism, Nationhood, South-Africa

What do you know, “More children around the world are being taught in English, often badly,” reveals The Economist, in the article, “Language without Instruction.

“History provides some intriguing examples of the effect of being educated in the mother tongue or some other language.”

A policy change in South Africa introduced in 1955 by the apartheid government used the medium of education to sharpen the divide between whites and blacks, increasing the years of schooling that children got in their mother tongue. Two extra years of mother-tongue schooling, instead of schooling in Afrikaans or English, raised both literacy and wages, according to a recent study of historical data.

Of course, The Economist, whose reporting I value immensely, asserts foolishly that the reason “the apartheid government” increased “the years of schooling that children got in their mother tongue” was to increase racial divisions.

Not true. The policies of separate development were rooted in a belief that human beings were attached to their own tribe and would be less restive and more well-adjusted if educated in their own ways, rather than anglicized.

(Related: “Apartheid In Black And White: Survivalism, Not Racism (2)”)

In any case, scholars have discovered that across the non-English speaking parts of the world, kids fare better when English is a subject, but not a medium, of education.

Does this mean that tribalism reveals itself in educational patterns and proclivities? That people exhibit a belonging that can’t be easily erased?

UPDATED (5/27/019): More murder: Rage, Annette Kennealy …

A Secret About The Privileged Trevor Noah

Celebrity, Comedy & Humor, Political Correctness, South-Africa

Every authentic South African wants to punch the untalented ex-pat Trevor Noah. This privileged celebrity, host of the once-funny Daily Show, hasn’t a funny bone in his body. Yet his job is comedy. Nightly, Noah disgraces South Africa, a country that once had a vibrant, impolitic, satire and comedy tradition.

Isn’t our Trevor original? About the Covington Kids, and, in particular, Nick Sandmann, Trevor Noah said this: “Everyone ‘Wants to Punch That Kid.”